dipstick

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dipstick

Reagent strip Lab medicine A blotting paper impregnated with enzymes or chemicals sensitive to various parameters of clinical interest which, when dipped in urine, undergoes a color change, allowing a substance to be semiquantified–eg, BR, glucose and reducing substances, Hb, nitrates, ketones, pH, protein, specific gravity, urobilinogen. See Urinalysisis.

dip·stick

(dip'stik)
A strip of plastic or paper bearing one or more dots or squares of reagent, used to perform qualitative or semiquantitative tests on urine; chemical reaction occurs in the presence of serum, plasma, or urine. Results of tests are read as color changes.
References in periodicals archive ?
So, did supply send the wrong dipstick or has there been a change where a two-sided dipstick is no longer required?
Due to demand, Dipsticks has expanded and transferred its successful principals and innovative methods to a new market through the Public Knowledge brand.
The correct dipstick to use is NSN 6680-01-530-0487.
On admission the sensitivity and specificity of the urinary trypsinogen-2 dipstick in predicting severe AP were 62% and 87%, respectively, whereas they were 62% and 77% for the quantitative assay.
The dipstick is known to break off where it mounts into the rubber pull-handle so tell your mechanic if it is broken.
Ask us anything about sex, love or lesbians at lipstick dipstick.com.
Evaluation of determination of glucose in urine with some commercially available dipsticks and tablets.
Lesley-Ann Mitchell, of Dipsticks Research, said: "There are such a wide range of courses and funding available we have been able to offer developmental training to all our staff."
Dipsticks have been widely used for such a long time that their reliability and efficacy are sometimes taken for granted.
The extensive specialised experience in advertising and media which Fiona and her husband had was a firm foundation when starting Dipsticks.
These problems have led to the widely used "sieve concept", which states that if the results of chemical screening with dipsticks are negative, then microscopic examination is unnecessary.