teasel

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Related to Dipsacus fullonum: Dipsacus sylvestris, Dipsacus sativus

teasel

Chinese medicine
A perennial plant, the root of which is analgesic, haemostatic and tonic; it is used for breast tumours, fractures, low back pain, menstrual disorders, postpartum bleeding, sports injuries, increased urinary frequency, and Raynaud phenomenon. 

Herbal medicine
Teasel was once used in Western herbal medicine as an anti-inflammatory, diaphoretic, diuretic and digestive tonic; it is rarely used by modern herbologists.
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Of the 104 exotic taxa occurring at DWNP, twenty-one have a high invasive rank, such as Ailanthus altissima, Alliaria petiolata, Artemisia vulgaris, Conium maculatum, Dipsacus fullonum, Fallopia japonica, Lonicera spp., Rosa multiflora, and Securigera varia.
DIPSACUS FULLONUM L.: SYN: Dipsacus sylvestris Huds., Dipsacus fullonum L.
The most common exotics species included Chenopodium album, Cirsium arvense, Dipsacus fullonum, Echinochloa crusgalli, Glechoma hederacea, Polygonum persicaria, Rumex crispus, Setaria faberi, Silene latifolia ssp.
(*) Dipsacus fullonum L.; SYN: Dipsacus sylvestris Huds., Dipsacus Jullonum L.
sylvestris 1.2, Galeopsis tetrahit 1.1, Rumex obtusifolius 1.1, Galium aparine 2.2, Polygonum persicaria +, Agropyron repens 1.3, Eupatorium cannabinum +, Lapsana communis +, Chenopodium album +, Dipsacus fullonum +, Carduus crispus +.2, Sisymbrium officinale +, Arctium minus +, Bromus rigidus +, Convolvulus sepium 1.3, Cirsium arvense +, Bromus tectorum +, Stellaria media +, Bromus ramosus +, Carex muricata +.
During Years 1-3 of the chronosequence the dominant plant species included the annuals Setaria faberi, Ambrosia artemisiifolia and biennials Daucus carota and Dipsacus fullonum. The perennials Symphyotrichum pilosum and Melilotus officinale were among the dominant species by Years 2-3.
The dry open field habitat is populated by Ambrosia artemisiifolia, Cirsium discolor, Conyza canadensis, Dipsacus fullonum, Medicago lupulina, Plantago virginica, Potentilla recta, Setaria pumila, Solidago canadensis, Tridens flavus, and Verbascum blattaria.
Since this site was converted from agricultural use to a tallgrass community, it still retained a legacy of nonnative weeds, species such as Cirsium arvense, Dipsacus fullonum, and Phalaris arundinacea.