dipole

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dipole

 [di´pōl]
1. a molecule having separated charges of equal and opposite sign.
2. a pair of electric charges or magnetic poles separated by a short distance.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

di·pole

(dī'pōl),
A pair of separated electrical charges, one or more positive and one or more negative; or a pair of separated partial charges.
Synonym(s): doublet (2)
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dipole

An MRI term for a magnetic field with unique north and south magnetic poles separated by a finite distance.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

di·pole

(dī'pōl)
A pair of separated electrical charges, one or more positive and one or more negative; or a pair of separated partial charges.
Synonym(s): doublet (2) .
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
This defines [[tau].sub.ed] as the characteristic timescale to damp an angular momentum of order [[sigma].sub.L] through electric dipole radiation (note that this definition of [[tau].sub.ed] is different from the ones adopted in [7, 8], where [[sigma].sup.2.sub.L] = 3Ik[T.sub.gas] was specifically used in (32) to define [[tau].sub.ed]).
For [[tau].sub.ed] [much less than] [tau], which is often the case for the smallest grains, the most likely angular momentum results from equilibrium between damping through electric dipole radiation and excitations through other mechanisms and is approximately
Electric Dipole Radiation and Absorption of CMB Photons
A grain emitting electric dipole radiation also radiates away angular momentum.
By General Relativity, if the monopole radiation is due to the Earth, it is affected by the gravitation and rotation of the Earth's space so that the temperature of the monopole radiation is as well higher than the dipole radiation far away from the Earth.
So General Relativity's role in the relativistic lowering of the dipole radiation temperature is infinitesimal.
Its instruments should register only the dipole radiation from the Universe.
Daniels, "Nearfield dipole radiation dynamics through FDTD modeling," Journal of Applied Geophysics, Vol.
Ketterson, "Near-field and farfield electric dipole radiation in the vicinity of a planar dielectric half space," New Journal of Physics, Vol.