chromosome number

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chromosome number

the number of CHROMOSOMES found in a cell, usually in the diploid state; thus humans have a chromosome number of 46, made up of 23 pairs.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2018), the two karyotype forms I and II (species) possess a diploid number (2n) of 60 and 62 chromosomes and a fundamental number (NF) of 73 and 77, and autosomal number (NFa) of 70 and 74, respectively.
ubajara is the lowest diploid number recorded for spiders with monocentric chromosomes.
MCN-M 986 (M) Necromys lasiurus UFMG 3836 (M) 2n: diploid number; FN: fundamental number; M: male; F: female; MCN-M: Museu de Ciencias Naturais-Pontificia Universidade Catolica (PUC), Minas Gerais; UFMG: Centro de Colecoes Taxonomicas-Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Minas Gerais.
This race differs from the specimens examined from the same area in the arm number (Gaziantep B, Yuksel & Gulkac 1992) and/or in the diploid number (Gaziantep C, Nevo et al.
Astyanax aff.paranae, considered as part of the "scabripinnis complex" (Graca and Pavanelli, 2007), highlighted two sympatric karyomorphs in the Andira stream (populations A and B) showing distinct diploid numbers and karyotypic formulas.
The coefficient variability of the diploid number of chromosomes in all cases, even less than 2.0%.
In some localities (Salar de Pipanaco, 30 km S of Mendoza Capital and Finca La Betania), the observed diploid numbers indicated that there are present more than one fusion in heterozygous state; because otherwise it would have been impossible to find more than one odd diploid number together.
The drastic reduction in diploid number from 48 chromosomes to 2n = 36 and 2n = 34, respectively, along the presence of large metacentric pairs is evidence of sequential Robertsonian rearrangements or centric fusions (Figures 2(c) and 2(e)).
Karyological studies suggest that the species has a diploid number of 44, however different populations differ in the types of chromosomes.
The Cichlidae family is considered a group with conserved chromosomal macrostructure, where most of the analyzed species have a diploid number of 48 chromosomes (FELDBERG et al., 2003).
orophilus and the diploid number of Peruvian populations of A.
The diploid number of chromosomes in long-horned beetle species range between 10 and 36.