diphenoxylate


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Related to diphenoxylate: Loperamide, diphenoxylate hydrochloride

diphenoxylate

 [di″fen-ok´sĭ-lāt]
an agent derived from meperidine, used as the hydrochloride salt for its antiperistaltic action in management of diarrhea.

diphenoxylate

(dī′fĭ-nŏk′sĭ-lāt′)
n.
An oral drug derived from meperidine, C30H32N2O2, that counteracts peristalsis and is used in its hydrochloride form primarily in combination with atropine to treat diarrhea.

diphenoxylate

A drug related to PETHIDINE and with a codeine-like action on the bowel. It is used to treat diarrhoea. It is sold, mixed with a little ATROPINE, under the brand name of Lomotil.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the 12 months ending May 2018, the diphenoxylate hydrochloride and atropine sulfate tablet market had US sales of approximately USD64m, according to IQVIA.
At the 100th day after feeding diphenoxylate suspension, the number of defecations per day in the STC group was less than that of the control group (P < 0.05), while dry weight of feces and intestinal transit time were greater than that of the control group (P<0.05) (Table 1).
Each extract was administered to one group, diphenoxylate to another, and a third group served as vehicle-treated control.
Officials discovered six controlled substances among the packages, including lorazepam, codeine sulfate and diphenoxylate, and about ten percent of the drugs were antibiotics.
Diphenoxylate can be very hazardous to toddlers, even with low dose ingestion.
Antimotility agents (loperamide, diphenoxylate, and paregoric) primarily reduce diarrhea by slowing transit time in the gut, and, thus, allows more time for absorption.
Toxic megacolon is an uncontrolled dilation of the colonic area, which has an increased incidence with the use of agents that slow gastric motility (i.e., loperamide [Immodium[R]], atropine with diphenoxylate [Lomotil[R]], opioid analgesics [morphine, demerol, codeine, etc.]).
Antiperistaltic agents (e.g., diphenoxylate and loperamide) can be used for the treatment of mild diarrhea.
Available controlled studies indicate that prophylactic use of difenoxine, the active metabolite of diphenoxylate (Lomotil), actually increases the incidence of TD in addition to producing other undesirable side effects.
(Poppy Husk) Drug Abuse Corex Alprazolam 1 - - - - - 2 A (5) - - - - 3 A (7) - - - - 4 B - - - - 5 B C - - - 6 C - - - - 7 - A - - - 8 - - B - - 9 - - - - - 10 - A B (5) - - 11 A (4) - - - - 12 - - - - - 13 B - - - - 14 A (15) - - B - 15 - D - B - 16 B C - - - 17 B E - - G 10 18 - B A (7) - - 19 - B (2) - - - 20 - B - - - 21 - D - A - 22 - - - - - 23 - -B - - - 24 - - - - C 6 25 - - B - - 26 - - B - - (* Contains dextropropoxyphene; contains diphenoxylate; contains codeine).
Clinicians should monitor stool output closely; stop supportive medications for constipation; use oral loperamide (Imodium) up to 16 mg/day, or diphenoxylate plus atropine (Lomotil) 5 mg two to four times per day; give intravenous fluids; rule out C.
One patient received metronidazole for 4 weeks as well as diphenoxylate, but did not respond.