Diogenes syndrome


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Dementia-related lassitude in which a subject allows his/her home and personal environment to deteriorate, and may collect objects of little value—e.g., string, newspapers
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Diogenes syndrome

Senile neglect Geriatrics Dementia-related lassitude in which a subject allows his home and personal environment to deteriorate, and may collect objects of little value–eg, string, newspapers
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Diogenes syndrome

(dī-oj′ĕ-nēz)
[Diogenes of Sinope, Gr. philosopher, 412–323b.c.]
A lack of interest in personal cleanliness or cleanliness of the home, usually occurring in the elderly who live alone. Those affected are usually undernourished but not necessarily from poverty. This condition occurs in all socioeconomic circumstances. It may be associated with excessive saving of items, e.g., old newspapers; social retreat; and rejection of assistance.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

Diogenes,

of Sinope, Greek philosopher, 412-323 B.C.
Diogenes cup - the palm of the hand when contracted and deepened by the action of the muscles on either side. Synonym(s): poculum diogenis
Diogenes syndrome - condition of self-neglect generally observed in older individuals, associated with deficiencies in nutrition.
poculum diogenis - Synonym(s): Diogenes cup
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Dermatitis passivata: the young Diogenes syndrome. Cutis.
with Diogenes Syndrome have no psychiatric history.
Diogenes Syndrome: Of Omelettes and Souffles, 44 J.
al., A Look at Diogenes Syndrome, 18 Clinical Geriatrics 45, 45 (2010).
Dementia: A Case of Apparent Diogenes Syndrome, 19 Int.
The authors concluded that "squalid living conditions were more likely to be associated with a mental or physical disorder than with the narrowly defined Diogenes syndrome" (Lancet 355[9207]:882-86, 2000).
Orrell and Sahakian's [11] hypothesis that Diogenes syndrome is really a manifestation of a frontal-lobe dementia is intriguing but there is little supporting evidence.
Overall it seems that no single model satisfactorily explains the development of Diogenes syndrome. The most convincing hypothesis is that proposed by Clarke et al.
Effective management of people with Diogenes syndrome is hindered by a number of practical difficulties.