hermaphrodite

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Related to Dioecious species: Dioecy

hermaphrodite

 [her-maf´ro-dīt]
an individual with hermaphroditism, presence of tissue of both male and female gonads; the ovaries and testes may be present as separate organs, or ovarian and testicular tissue may be combined in the same organ (ovotestis).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

her·maph·ro·dite

(her-maf'rō-dīt),
A person with hermaphroditism or intersexuality; also called intersex.
[G. Hermaphroditos, the son of Hermēs, Mercury, + Aphroditē, Venus]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

hermaphrodite

(hər-măf′rə-dīt′)
n.
An animal or plant exhibiting hermaphroditism.

her·maph′ro·dit′ic (-dĭt′ĭk) adj.
her·maph′ro·dit′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
A human or other organism with hermaphroditism—i.e., with both male—e.g., testes—and female—e.g., ovaries—characteristics
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

her·maph·ro·dite

(hĕr-maf'rō-dīt)
An individual (e.g., human or animal) with hermaphroditism.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

hermaphrodite

  1. any plant possessing stamens and carpels in the same flower.
  2. any animal possessing both male and female sex organs. The condition is usual in many plants and lower animals, but may occur in some unisexual organisms as an abnormality.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Multiple visits to the same plant of a dioecious species can increase the pollen load that has to be transported to other plants sometimes a long distance away.
Male-specific DNA in the dioecious species Atriplex garrettii (Chenopodiaceae).
However, even a stock exhibiting the reproductive sucess rule has dynamics that are distinctly different from those of a dioecious species because a change in the size distribution of the population due to size-selective fishing is predicted to have a large effect on the productivity and sex ratio of the protogynous population.
[c] The New York Botanical Garden 2011 Table 1 A Family Level Comparison Between the Number and Type of Dioecious Species that have been Studied and those that Exist All dioecy Studied P=0.05 Distribution Tropical 145 15 Df=1 (130.6) (29.4) c.v=3.84 Temperate 77 35 X^2=20.98 (91.4) (20.6) Life form Tree 85 38 Df=2 (96.9) (26.1) c.v=5.99 Herb 70 20 X^2 =16.16 (70.9) (19.1) Shrub 98 10 (85.1) (22.9) Pollination Abiotic 53 21 Df=1 (62.1) (11.9) c.v=3.84 Biotic 124 13 X^2=12.76 (114.9) (22.1) Table 2 Evidence for Differential Resource Allocation to Reproduction Between the Sexes.
warwickii is larger than that of the dioecious species Scalpellum stearnsii, where 69% of females had no neighbors (Ozaki et al., 2008).
This is a minimum estimate of the number of transitions in mating systems in the family: we based our inferences on experimental reports for some species, anecdotal reports for others, and certain assumptions (i.e., that species with stylar movements that ensure self-pollination, or that possess cleistogamous flowers, are in fact self-compatible; and that dioecious species are self-incompatible).
One might expect that the two dioecious species would be more closely related and therefore the genome sizes of these two species to be similar.
Since Clusia is a genus constituted predominantly by dioecious species, this approach opens interesting possibilities.
When some male size classes escape fishing, we predict that the mean population size of sex-changing stocks will decrease proportionally less than the mean population size of dioecious species experiencing the same fishing mortality.
Some of the best low pollen trees are the females of dioecious species such as ash, poplar, willow, cedar, juniper, cottonwood, mulberry, osage orange, xylosma, yew, box elder, podocarpus, fringe tree, holly, pepper tree, smoke tree, coffee tree, sassafras and red maple.
Two features of gynodioecious systems, in particular, cause this to be a somewhat different problem than the question of frequency-dependent fitness and sex ratio evolution in dioecious species. First, hermaphrodites can transmit genes through both male and female function, whereas male steriles can only transmit genes through the female function.