dimer

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dimer

 
1. a compound formed by combination of two identical simpler molecules.
2. a capsomer having two structural subunits.
D-dimer a fragment of fibrin that is formed as a result of fibrin degradation. A positive test for its presence in the blood is suggestive of conditions such as thrombotic disease, sickle cell crisis, malignancy, disseminated intravascular coagulation, or recent surgery.

di·mer

(dī'mĕr),
A compound or unit produced by the combination of two like molecules; in the strictest sense, this occurs without the loss of atoms (thus, nitrogen tetroxide, N2O4, is the dimer of nitrogen dioxide, NO2), but usually by elimination of H2O or a similar small molecule between the two (for example, a disaccharide), or by simple noncovalent association (as of two identical protein molecules); higher orders of complexity are called trimers, tetramers, oligomers, and polymers.
[G. di-, two, + -mer]

di·mer

(dī'mĕr)
A compound or unit produced by the combination of two like molecules; in the strictest sense, without loss of atoms (thus nitrogen tetroxide, N2O4, is the dimer of nitrogen dioxide, NO2), but usually by elimination of H2O or a similar small molecule between the two (e.g., a disaccharide), or by simple noncovalent association (as of two identical protein molecules); higher orders of complexity are called trimers, tetramers, oligomers, and polymers.
[G. di-, two, + -mer]

dimer

a molecule made by the joining of two molecules of the same kind, i.e. two MONOMERS. Ultraviolet light can induce THYMINE DIMERS in DNA.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Peter Charbel Issa, who led the team and is now at the University of Bonn in Germany, said: "If we can reduce the rate at which vitamin A dimerises, we could reduce the genetically-induced build-up of lipofuscin and slow down the progress of retinal degeneration"
Nrf2 translocates into the nucleus where it dimerises with other bZip transcription factors like small-Maf proteins.
Whether different conformations of the EPOR activate different intracellular pathways or whether the single EPOR chain (in the case of CEPO) dimerises with other membrane proteins to provide the protective effect is currently not known (18).