Digitalis purpurea


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Related to Digitalis purpurea: digoxin, digitoxin, digitalis toxicity

Digitalis purpurea

Herbal medicine
Popularly known as foxglove, see there.
 
Homeopathy
See Digitalis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Molecular evolutionary' characterization of P5[beta]R from Digitalis purpurea.
Effects of mineral salts, initial pH and precursors on digitoxin formation by shoot-forming cultures of Digitalis purpurea L.
En las areas de claro con oferta luminica durante todo el dia, se observa la regeneracion de especies heliofilas como Ulex europaeus (20% cobertura), Digitalis purpurea (19% de cobertura), Rubus bogotensis (8% cobertura) y Pteridium aquilinum (5% de cobertura) principalmente, que utilizan mecanismos de propagacion reproductivo y vegetativo que les permite ocupar los micrositios de implantacion en el suelo luego de cortos periodos de tiempo, generando una fuerte competencia entre si por la dominancia en el area.
We report differences in foraging behavior of three Andean bumblebee species on flowers of Digitalis purpurea (Scrophulariaceae).
Digitalis purpurea, being native seems to thrive anywhere, even in that most difficult of situations, dry shade.
Scarcity of flower colour polymorphism in field populations of Digitalis purpurea L.
Good choices include the pure white Cosmos 'Purity', Digitalis purpurea 'Alba', the white foxglove, and Cerastium Tomentosum 'Silver Carpet' (snow-in-summer), a vigorous mat-forming perennial which produces silvery white woolly foliage and a mass of pure white flowers when in bloom.
If you want seedlings to colour-match your flowerbeds, note that only the purple stalked seedlings of digitalis purpurea have purple flowers and the others have white.
William Withering was not the first to recognise the medical properties of digitalis purpurea, as the plant is properly called.
Despite its flashy appearance, Digitalis purpurea is surprisingly easy to grow.
Foxgloves of many other kinds and colours are available, many of them bred from that native Digitalis purpurea, but, interesting though they are, I'll leave them for other people's gardens.
Atropa belladonna (deadly nightshade) n Colchicum autumnale (autumn crocus, meadow saffron) Conium maculatum (hemlock) n Daphne mezereum (mezereon) Datura stamonium (Jimsonweed) Digitalis purpurea (foxglove) Laburnum Oenanthe crocata (hemlock water dropwort