gastric juice

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gastric

 [gas´trik]
pertaining to, affecting, or originating in the stomach.
gastric analysis analysis of the stomach contents by microscopy and tests to determine the amount of hydrochloric acid present. The tests performed are of value in diagnosing peptic ulcer, cancer of the stomach, and pernicious anemia. Gastric secretions are collected by continuous or intermittent aspiration via nasogastric tube. There is a wide overlap of the ranges of normal and abnormal values; hence intermediate values are not indicative of pathology. A total absence of acid (pH above 6.0) occurs in almost all cases of pernicious anemia and in some patients with advanced gastric carcinoma. Hypersecretion of hydrochloric acid is characteristic of zollinger-ellison syndrome, which is marked by intractable, sometimes fulminating peptic ulcer, gastric hyperacidity, and gastrin-secreting pancreatic tumors.
gastric bypass surgical creation of a small gastric pouch that empties directly into the jejunum through a gastrojejunostomy, thereby causing food to bypass the duodenum; done for the treatment of gross obesity.
gastric juice the secretion of glands in the walls of the stomach for use in digestion. Its essential ingredients are pepsin, an enzyme that breaks down proteins in food, and hydrochloric acid, which destroys bacteria and helps in the digestive process.

At the sight and smell of food, the stomach increases its output of gastric juice. When the food reaches the stomach, it is thoroughly mixed with the juice, the breakdown of the proteins is begun and the food then passes on to the duodenum for the next stage of digestion.

Normally the hydrochloric acid in gastric juice does not irritate or injure the delicate stomach tissues. However, in certain persons the stomach produces too much gastric juice, especially between meals when it is not needed, and the gastric secretions presumably erode the stomach lining, producing a peptic ulcer, and also hinder its healing once an ulcer has formed.
gastric partitioning a procedure of the treatment of morbid obesity consisting of the creation of a small pouch in the proximal stomach by two rows of staples, which are deliberately interrupted at one point to allow passage of food from the pouch to the rest of the stomach. This procedure is rarely done today because of its high failure rate. The two favored operations are the gastric bypass and the vertical banded gastroplasty.

juice

 [jo̳s]
any fluid from animal or plant tissue.
gastric juice see gastric juice.
intestinal juice the liquid secretion of glands in the intestinal lining.
pancreatic juice the enzyme-containing secretion of the pancreas, conducted through its ducts to the duodenum.
prostatic juice the liquid secretion of the prostate, which contributes to semen formation.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

gas·tric juice

the digestive fluid secreted by the glands of the stomach; a thin colorless liquid of acid reaction containing primarily hydrochloric acid, chymosin, pepsinogen, and intrinsic factor plus mucus.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

gastric juice

n.
The colorless, watery, acidic digestive fluid that is secreted by various glands in the mucous membrane of the stomach and consists chiefly of hydrochloric acid, pepsin, rennin, and mucin.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

gastric juice

A fluid containing water, electrolytes, HCl, mucin, pepsin, gastrin and intrinsic factor–necessary to absorb vitamin B12. See Gastric analysis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

gas·tric juice

(gastrik jūs)
Digestive fluid secreted by stomach glands of the stomach; colorless liquid of acid reaction containing primarily hydrochloric acid, chymosin, pepsinogen, intrinsic factor, and mucus.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

gastric juice

The watery mixture of hydrochloric acid, pepsin and mucin secreted by the glands in the lining of the stomach. Gastric juice has a powerful digestive action on protein and is also protective against many infective organisms.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

gastric juice

the fluid secreted by glands of the stomach, containing PEPSIN, RENNIN, and hydrochloric acid.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

gas·tric juice

(gastrik jūs)
Digestive fluid secreted by stomach glands; thin colorless liquid of acid reaction containing primarily hydrochloric acid.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
This operation allows stomach acid and bile to enter the esophagus and is a reasonable representation of how GERD develops in humans--acidic digestive juices from the stomach surge into the esophagus.
"We urgently need investment in research." DIFFICULT TO DIAGNOSE The pancreas, located behind the stomach and shaped like a leaf, produces digestive juices as well as insulin to balance sugar levels in the blood.
Digestive juices are then released to consume the insect.
These multicoloured sacs of digestive juices trap passing cockroaches, mice and small mammals, which stand little chance of escape.
Acidic digestive juices can dissolve copper if the penny sits in the dog's stomach long enough, and that exposes the zinc.
Once breached, the acid from the stomach, the digestive juices and bile from the liver can all irritate the exposed tissues and contribute to the development of a chronic peptic ulcer.
After biting a victim with its fangs and injecting venom to paralyze the squirming supper, the spider spits digestive juices into its prey.
For about 5 hours, the larvae oozed digestive juices onto the meat, dissolving it into a slurpable meal.
Once swallowed, the worms most likely drowned in his stomach's digestive juices, the chemicals that break down food.
Exocrine (pronounced EX-o-krin) cells are part of the exocrine system and produce the digestive juices. Endocrine (pronounced EN-doe-krin) cells are part of the endocrine system and produce the hormones.
The more you chew, the more you allow time for your digestive juices to do what they're meant to do.
Until the early nineteenth century, organic chemistry was the chemistry of substances occurring naturally in animal and vegetable matter, such as blood, digestive juices, and sap.