DiGeorge's syndrome

DiGeorge's syndrome

 [dĭ-jor´jez]
a condition in which a child is born without a thymus gland, resulting in a complete absence of functional T cells. Normal B cell function is present.
References in periodicals archive ?
Renewed immunity A thymus-tissue transplant enabled babies that were born with DiGeorge's syndrome to develop functional immune systems (164: 69).
A congenital birth defect seen in humans, DiGeorge's syndrome, involves the failure of the thymus to develop and an absence of circulating T-cells and cell-mediated immunity.
Clinicians estimate that DiGeorge's syndrome affects 1 in 4,000 newborns and is the second most common cause of congenital heart defects.