diffraction

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diffraction

 [dĭ-frak´shun]
the bending or breaking up of a ray of light into its component parts.

dif·frac·tion

(di-frak'shŭn),
Deflection of the rays of light from a straight line in passing by the edge of an opaque body or in passing an obstacle of about the size of the wavelength of the light.
[L. dif- fringo, pp. -fractus, to break in pieces]

diffraction

/dif·frac·tion/ (dĭ-frak´shun) the bending or breaking up of a ray of light into its component parts.

diffraction

[difrak′shən]
Etymology: L, dis, opposite of, frangere, to break
the bending and scattering of wavelengths of light or other radiation as the radiation passes around obstacles or through narrow slits. X-ray diffraction is used in the study of the internal structure of cells. See also refraction.

dif·frac·tion

(di-frak'shŭn)
Deflection of the rays of light from a straight line in passing by the edge of an opaque body or in passing an obstacle of about the size of the wavelength of the light.
[L. dif- fringo, pp. -fractus, to break in pieces]

diffraction

deflection of light rays by their passage from one medium into another, e.g. from air into water

diffraction

Deviation of the direction of propagation of a beam of light, which occurs when the light passes the edge of an obstacle such as a diaphragm, the pupil of the eye or a spectacle frame. There are two consequences of this phenomenon. First, the image of a point source cannot be a point image but a diffraction pattern. This pattern depends upon the shape and size of the diaphragm as well as the wavelength of light. Second, a system of close, parallel and equidistant grooves, slits or lines ruled on a polished surface can produce a light spectrum by diffraction. This is called a diffraction grating. See Airy's disc; diffraction fringes; Maurice's theory.

diffraction

the bending or breaking up of a ray of light into its component parts.

x-ray diffraction
a method used to determine the three-dimensional structure of the single object, e.g. protein molecule, that composes the crystal. Based on recording and analyzing the diffraction pattern of an x-ray beam passing through a crystalline structure, either organic or inorganic.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a strategic move, it acquired Holographix Inc, a diffractive optics manufacturer last May (see HN Vol 14 No 4).
A few went into detail on applied systems that use diffractive optics in network components.
Modilis has responded to these market needs by using its patented, industrialised diffractive optics (DO) solutions, and developing a lightguide solution capable of eliminating the need for the currently used prismatic films for brightness enhancement in TFT-LCDs.
It seems that the use of diffractive optics was the key to our success, as conventional technologies cannot offer the same level of performance" says Leo Hatjasalo, President and CEO of Modilis.
At the same time, Modilis has introduced the world's thinnest, and flexible, lightguide solution, also based on diffractive optics (DO).
As always, both of these latest lightguide solutions from Modilis, also boast excellent brightness, uniformity, and white balance, made possible with the use of modulated diffractive optics (DO).
Oy Modilis LTD is a leading-edge technology company in the field of diffractive optics, with expertise in electrical, material and diffractive optic engineering.
In May this year, ADC (NASDAQ: ADCT), an American corporation that describes itself as 'The Broadband Company bought Danish diffractive optics producer Ibsen Micro Structures as part of its strategy to position itself strongly in photonics.
headquartered in Salem, NH, is an independent designer and manufacturer of structured light lasers, light emitting diodes (LEDs), fiber optic, and fluorescent illumination technologies as well as specialty optical fiber, phase masks, and diffractive optics for use in a wide range of markets and industries including the machine vision, telecommunications, aerospace, defense and security, utilities, industrial inspection, and medical.