diffraction

(redirected from Diffraction limit)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

diffraction

 [dĭ-frak´shun]
the bending or breaking up of a ray of light into its component parts.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dif·frac·tion

(di-frak'shŭn),
Deflection of the rays of light from a straight line in passing by the edge of an opaque body or in passing an obstacle of about the size of the wavelength of the light.
[L. dif- fringo, pp. -fractus, to break in pieces]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dif·frac·tion

(di-frak'shŭn)
Deflection of the rays of light from a straight line in passing by the edge of an opaque body or in passing an obstacle of about the size of the wavelength of the light.
[L. dif- fringo, pp. -fractus, to break in pieces]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

diffraction

Deviation of the direction of propagation of a beam of light, which occurs when the light passes the edge of an obstacle such as a diaphragm, the pupil of the eye or a spectacle frame. There are two consequences of this phenomenon. First, the image of a point source cannot be a point image but a diffraction pattern. This pattern depends upon the shape and size of the diaphragm as well as the wavelength of light. Second, a system of close, parallel and equidistant grooves, slits or lines ruled on a polished surface can produce a light spectrum by diffraction. This is called a diffraction grating. See Airy's disc; diffraction fringes; Maurice's theory.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, silicon nanowires have been shown to have high nonlinearity, but they are limited in size due to the diffraction limit. In addition, photonic crystal waveguides have been shown to have high nonlinearity with strong mode confinement but cannot be easily integrated on chips.
Sub- diffraction PA imaging of gold nanoparticles has been demonstrated with a resolution of ~ 80 nm, three times smaller than the optical diffraction limit. Another sub-optical-diffraction PA imaging method was reported by Nedosekin et al., with a resolution of ~ 100 nm for nanoparticles, where nonlinear signal amplification by nanobubbles circumvented the optical diffraction limit [103].
Microscopy techniques have been developed that exploit all of these caveats to break the diffraction limit. The near-field scanning optical microscope scans a tiny probe across the surface of a specimen at distances over which near-field effects come into play.
In the PapMap SCP method described, the surface of the entire sample area is automatically scanned at a pixel size smaller than the diffraction limit, regardless of whether or not the surface is occupied by a cell, producing a large spectral dataset of the entire sample area.
Such research has the potential to boost the scaling of optical technologies below the diffraction limit, opening unprecedented opportunities for basic and applied research.
The technology overcomes the classical diffraction limit to microscopic resolution by combining a special illumination pattern with state-of-the-art computational image analysis.
In any optical system, there is a limit, termed diffraction limit, which determines the minimum focal area and hence the maximum irradiance that can be attained (Ready, 2001).
This enables scientists in biomedical research to image cellular structures marked with fluorescent dyes with maximum spatial resolution below the classic diffraction limit of microscopes, i.e.
* A 1 [micro] output is less than 1.5 times the diffraction limit.
Researchers have circumvented the diffraction limit before.
Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) has extended optical measurements past the diffraction limit, making it possible for the first time to view objects and features in the 50 to 100 nanometer (nm) range.
Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is an interesting technique that surmounts one of the limitations of ordinary light microscopy: the diffraction limit. For a microscope using visible light (400-700 nm), the diffraction limit is roughly 250 nm.