diffraction

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diffraction

 [dĭ-frak´shun]
the bending or breaking up of a ray of light into its component parts.

dif·frac·tion

(di-frak'shŭn),
Deflection of the rays of light from a straight line in passing by the edge of an opaque body or in passing an obstacle of about the size of the wavelength of the light.
[L. dif- fringo, pp. -fractus, to break in pieces]

diffraction

/dif·frac·tion/ (dĭ-frak´shun) the bending or breaking up of a ray of light into its component parts.

diffraction

[difrak′shən]
Etymology: L, dis, opposite of, frangere, to break
the bending and scattering of wavelengths of light or other radiation as the radiation passes around obstacles or through narrow slits. X-ray diffraction is used in the study of the internal structure of cells. See also refraction.

dif·frac·tion

(di-frak'shŭn)
Deflection of the rays of light from a straight line in passing by the edge of an opaque body or in passing an obstacle of about the size of the wavelength of the light.
[L. dif- fringo, pp. -fractus, to break in pieces]

diffraction

deflection of light rays by their passage from one medium into another, e.g. from air into water

diffraction

Deviation of the direction of propagation of a beam of light, which occurs when the light passes the edge of an obstacle such as a diaphragm, the pupil of the eye or a spectacle frame. There are two consequences of this phenomenon. First, the image of a point source cannot be a point image but a diffraction pattern. This pattern depends upon the shape and size of the diaphragm as well as the wavelength of light. Second, a system of close, parallel and equidistant grooves, slits or lines ruled on a polished surface can produce a light spectrum by diffraction. This is called a diffraction grating. See Airy's disc; diffraction fringes; Maurice's theory.

diffraction

the bending or breaking up of a ray of light into its component parts.

x-ray diffraction
a method used to determine the three-dimensional structure of the single object, e.g. protein molecule, that composes the crystal. Based on recording and analyzing the diffraction pattern of an x-ray beam passing through a crystalline structure, either organic or inorganic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Microscopy techniques have been developed that exploit all of these caveats to break the diffraction limit.
Although electron microscopy can image and analyze objects on a much smaller scale, the advantages of using light for both imaging and spectroscopic analysis have driven technology to overcome the diffraction limit for optical microscopy.
Liu, "Superlenses to overcome the diffraction limit," Nature Materials, Vol.
The 11 papers here consider such topics as photonic properties of non-crystalline solids, ultrasonic wave transport in strongly scattering media, Anderson localization of ultrasound in three dimensions, time reversal focusing and the diffraction limit, and strongly correlated ultracold bosonic and fermionic quantum gases in optical lattices.
This novel optical surface profiler mode combines patent-pending hardware and software to enable select models of Bruker's ContourGT[R] 3D Optical Microscopes to break the optical diffraction limit and deliver lateral resolutions that were previously considered impossible to achieve.
This novel optical device harmlessly resolves fluorescently labeled bits of living cells that are smaller than the so-called diffraction limit, say its developers at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Gottingen, Germany.
For many years after its discovery, Raman spectroscopy was held back by the diffraction limit of light, which limits vibrational spectroscopic acquisition, and the chemical information this data contains, to 250 nm.
Astronomers have incorporated these techniques to image planets around Beta Pictoris and HR 8799, which lie at separations several times the telescope's diffraction limit.
Optical lenses are limited by the nature of light, the so-called diffraction limit, so even the best won't usually let us see objects smaller than 200 nanometers across, about the size of the smallest bacterium.
Among the techniques are the surface-induced structure formation of polymer blends, chemo-mechanical surface modifications of materials for patterning, ion-beam patterning, photolithography beyond the diffraction limit, manipulating biomolecules and reactions, and high-resolution printing techniques for plastic electronics.
Even at its calmest, however, the atmosphere blurs star images to a diameter at least 10 times greater than a large telescope's natural diffraction limit.
Enhanced Resolution Enables ContourGT 3D Optical Microscopes to Break Diffraction Limit