fat

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fat

 [fat]
1. the adipose tissue of the body.
2. a triglyceride (or triacylglycerol) that is an ester of fatty acids and glycerol. Each fat molecule contains one glycerol residue connected by ester linkages to three fatty acid residues, which may be the same or different. The fatty acids may have no double bonds in the carbon chain (saturated fatty acids), one double bond (monounsaturated), or two or more double bonds (polyunsaturated). Essential fatty acids cannot be synthesized by the body but must be obtained from the diet or from intravenous infusion of lipids.
Saturated and Unsaturated Fats. All of the common unsaturated fatty acids are liquid (oils) at room temperature. Through the process of hydrogenation, hydrogen can be incorporated into certain unsaturated fatty acids so that they are converted into solid fats for cooking purposes. Margarine is an example of the hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids into a solid substance.
brown fat a thermogenic type of adipose tissue containing a dark pigment, and arising during embryonic life in certain specific areas in many mammals, including humans (see illustration); it is prominent in the newborn. Called also brown adipose tissue.
Sites of brown fat in the neonate. From McKinney et al., 2000.
neutral fat fat (def. 2).
polyunsaturated fat a fat containing polyunsaturated fatty acids; see also fat.
saturated fat a fat containing saturated fatty acids; see also fat.
unsaturated fat a fat containing unsaturated fatty acids; see also fat.

fat

(fat),
1. Synonym(s): adipose tissue
2. Common term for obese.
3. A greasy, soft-solid material, found in animal tissues and many plants, composed of a mixture of glycerol esters; together with oils, fats comprise the homolipids.
4. A triacylglycerol or a mixture of triacylglycerols.
[A.S. faet]

fat

(făt)
n.
1.
a. The ester of glycerol and one, two, or three fatty acids.
b. Any of various soft, solid, or semisolid organic compounds constituting the esters of glycerol and fatty acids and their associated organic groups.
c. A mixture of such compounds occurring widely in organic tissue, especially in the adipose tissue of animals and in the seeds, nuts, and fruits of plants.
d. Animal tissue containing such substances.
e. A solidified animal or vegetable oil.
2. Obesity; corpulence: health risks associated with fat.
adj. fatter, fattest
1. Having much or too much fat or flesh; plump or obese.
2. Full of fat or oil; greasy.

fat′ly adv.
fat′ness n.

fat

A generic term for any of a class of neutral organic compounds formed by a molecule of glycerol linked to three fatty acids (a glycerol ester); fats are water-insoluble, ether soluble, solid at less than 20ºC, combustible and energy-rich (9.3 kcal/g).

fat

Any of a class of neutral organic compounds formed by a molecule of glycerol linked to 3 fatty acids–a glycerol ester; fats are water-insoluble, ether soluble, solid at ≤ 20ºC, combustible, energy-rich–9.3 kcal/g. See Animal fat, Baby fat, Fatty acids, Fish oil, Monounsaturated fat, Olive oil, Polyunsaturated fat, Saturated fatty acid, Tropical fat, Tropical oil, Unsaturated fat.

fat

(fat)
1. Synonym(s): adipose tissue.
2. Common colloquial term for obese
3. A greasy, soft-solid material, found in animal tissues and many plants, composed of a mixture of glycerol esters; together with oils they make up the homolipids.
4. A triacylglycerol or a mixture of triacylglycerols.
[A.S. faet]
Fig. 158 Fat. The formation of a triglyceride.click for a larger image
Fig. 158 Fat . The formation of a triglyceride.

fat

a type of simple LIPID found in almost all organisms, which is an important energy-storage molecule (containing twice as much energy as carbohydrates per gram) that can also aid in heat insulation, cushioning and protection. Fats are produced by a combination of one glycerol molecule, and three fatty acid molecules (which need not all be the same) forming a triglyceride. See Fig. 158 . Fats are abundant in plant seeds, and are also found in roots, stems and leaves, forming about 5% of the total dry weight. In animals, fats are stored in specialized cells making up ADIPOSE TISSUE. See also BROWN FAT.

fat

(fat)
1. Synonym(s): adipose tissue.
2. Common term for obese
3. A greasy, soft-solid material, found in animal tissues and many plants, composed of a mixture of glycerol esters; together with oils, fats comprise the homolipids.
4. A triacylglycerol or a mixture of triacylglycerols.
[A.S. faet]

Patient discussion about fat

Q. what do we need to do to burn excess fat from the body? Can anyone suggest particular exercise for burning excess fat from the body? and how to make six bag abs?

A. doing regular work outs and having a balanced nutrition will help your muscles to develop. muscles get bigger after they have been used repetitively over a certain period of time. that meant they will burn more energy while working and even while resting. then your fat layer will shrink over the time.

Q. what sort of diet should I take to tone up my muscle and to lose fat in my body? Is steroid a good idea?

A. as williams41 say- it's a BAD idea... steroids wil damage your body immune system and can get you more prone to bacterial/virus/fungal attacks. it also have unhealthy side effects that one of them is distribution of fat in the face area that can be unpleasant. so consider your steps...

Q. Is there any exercise which can cool my body and also help to reduce my fat belly and body? I am having big belly and fat body. My body is fatty and this makes me lazy and dull. I feel bad and have low self esteem. I have tried with exercise and it also helped me to get good body but I cannot keep it regular. Exercise makes my body which takes time to cool down. What shall I do? Is there any exercise which can cool my body and also help to reduce my fat belly and body?

A. i have to agree with william- swimming is a wonderful way to coll your body and loose weight. you can also run in the park during the winter, or skiing naked :)

More discussions about fat
References in periodicals archive ?
In comparison with dietary fat intake in children from other European countries, the average fat intake determined in this study (29.64 % of the total calorie intake) was within the reference range.
Alternatively, another way an obese adult could potentially achieve the same results is to cut dietary fat. The resulting state of fat imbalance would promote loss of body fat, according to Dr.
A: In terms of cancer risk, the primary thing we know is that it's a concentrated source of calories, so overdoing on dietary fat makes it easy to take in too many calories.
The metabolic use of energy from dietary fat in broilers is affected by fatty acid saturation.
However, choice of cereal grain as well as dietary fat type has received little attention as a factor affecting reproductive performance.
Early studies evaluating national average dietary fat intake and breast cancer incidence rates showed an almost linear relationship between increased dietary fat and increased breast cancer incidence.
The intervention group also participated in an intensive behavioral modification program using group sessions, self-monitoring techniques, and other strategies aimed to motivate and support reductions in dietary fat and increase consumption of vegetables, fruit, and grains.
Because dietary fat increases satiety, people may actually eat less and lose weight when fats are included (in moderation) as part of a diet plan, says Moore.
Until now, "there has not been evidence of a strong association" between dietary fat and sodium and stroke, said Lawrence Brass, M.D., professor of neurology, epidemiology, and public health at Yale University, New Haven.
We examined the influence of psychological factors (social physique anxiety, dietary self-efficacy), difficulties associated with making dietary changes and food security on stages of change for dietary fat reduction and increased fruit and vegetable intake in a non-probability convenience sample of New Zealand Maori women (N = 111) recruited through several acquaintanceship networks of the first author.
Until now, "there has not been evidence of a strong association" between dietary fat and sodium and stroke, commented Lawrence Brass, M.D., professor of neurology, epidemiology, and public health at Yale University, New Haven.
Environmental Protection Agency, presenters reviewed the scientific evidence for a wider expanse of predisposing factors, including environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure, obesity, dietary fat intake, oxidative stress, and in utero xenobiotic exposures.