dietary supplement

(redirected from Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

dietary supplement

n.
A product containing one or more vitamins, herbs, enzymes, amino acids, or other ingredients, that is taken orally to supplement one's diet, as by providing a missing nutrient.
References in periodicals archive ?
(49) Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act [section] 4 (codified as amended at 21 U.S.C.
When it enacted the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) in 1994, Congress recognized the role supplements could play in health promotion and in the prevention of chronic diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and osteoporosis.
In 1994, Congress passed the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act, which effectively removed all regulation of this $12 billion-a-year industry.
Part III gives an overview of current regulation under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994.
When the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA) was passed, it was heralded as the harbinger of a golden eras - not only for health-minded consumers, but for food companies seeking a healthier share of market.
Califf will work with the new Office of Dietary Supplement Programs and use the authority offered by the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA)"to protect and preserve consumer access to safe and beneficial dietary supplements."
Owing to public outcry of the early 1990s in which consumers and supplement makers argued for more market autonomy and self-determination (Kurtzweil 1998), the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (4) (DSHEA) was passed.
On October 25, 1994, President William Jefferson Clinton signed the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (Public Law 103-417), also known as DSHEA.
Under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 (DSHEA), only ingredients not marketed in the U.S.
The 1994 Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) created a new regulatory approach for products that included herbal products, vitamins, and minerals.
Henney promised to reevaluate the proposed rule for implementation of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994.