Dietary Guidelines for Americans


Also found in: Acronyms.

Di·e·tar·y Guide·lines for A·mer·i·cans

(dī'ĕ-tār-ē gīd'līnz ă-mer'i-kănz)
The recommendations of the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services for dietary intakes to reduce chronic diseases related to food intake (e.g., heart disease, diabetes, obesity).

Dietary Guidelines for Americans

Recommendations issued periodically and revised in 2000 from the Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion at the U.S. Department of Agriculture for planning and eating a healthy diet.
See: table; Food Guide Pyramid SOURCE: U.S. Department of Agriculture, www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/dga
AIM FOR FITNESS
Aim for a healthy weight.
Be physically active each day.
BUILD A HEALTHY BASE
Let the Food Guide Pyramid guide your food choices.
Choose a variety of grains daily, especially whole grains.
Choose a variety of fruits and vegetables daily.
Keep food safe to eat.
CHOOSE SENSIBLY
Choose a diet that is low in saturated fat and cholesterol and moderate in total fat.
Choose beverages and foods to moderate your intake of sugars.
Choose and prepare foods with less salt.
If you drink alcoholic beverages, do so in moderation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA)establish the scientific and policy basis for all Federal nutrition programs, including research, education, nutrition assistance, labeling, and nutrition promotion.
Yet fewer than one in four Americans meets this standard, which is recommended by the federal Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2000 should include a clear statement acknowledging the nutritional adequacy and health advantages associated with vegetarian lifestyles.
WASHINGTON -- Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius today announced that public comments are now being accepted on the Report of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010 (Advisory Report).
Robert Post, Deputy Director of USDA's Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion and Penelope Slade-Sawyer, HHS' Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, will provide information regarding the purpose, process, development and content of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2005 and MyPyramid recommend increasing fruit intake to 2 cups daily.
The program requires that all products in the school lunches meet the recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
The guidelines are comprehensive and consistent with The Dietary Guidelines for Americans that are issued by the USDA and the Department of Health and Human Services.
This research is consistent with the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans which recommend 3 servings of low-fat dairy foods each day and recognize that intake of dairy foods does not contribute to extra weight gain.
The USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans stress the importance of polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids for overall good health, reinforcing similar recommendations of organizations such as the American Heart Association (AHA).