Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet


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Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet

Abbreviation: DASH diet
A diet proven to treat stage I hypertension, consisting of generous amounts of cereals, fruits, and vegetables (for fiber, vitamins, and minerals), low-fat dairy products, nuts, and lean meats (to maximize protein intake without too much saturated fat and cholesterol). Guidelines for a diet of 2000 calories daily include seven to eight servings of grains and grain products; four to five servings of vegetables; four to five servings of fruits; two to three servings of low-fat or nonfat dairy products; two or fewer servings of lean meats, proteins, and fish. The plan also permits four to five servings of nuts, seeds, and legumes per week. It is recommended that sodium intake be less than 3000 g/day. The complete diet provides more specific recommendations for sodium. Compared with the diet recommended in the Food Guide Pyramid, this diet contains more fruits and vegetables but less fat. See: table
SOURCE: National Institutes of Health. September 1998; revised May 2003. Facts about the DASH Eating Plan. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/hbp/dash/new_dash.pdf
Food GroupDaily ServingsServing SizesExamples and NotesSignificance of Each Food Group to the DASH Eating Plan
Grains and grain products7–81 slice bread; 1 oz dry cereal; 1/2 C cooked rice, pasta, or cerealWhole wheat bread, English muffin, pita bread, bagel, cereals, grits, oatmeal, crackers, unsalted pretzels and popcornMajor sources of energy and fiber
Vegetables4–51 C raw leafy vegetable, 1/2 C cooked vegetable; 6 oz vegetable juiceTomatoes, potatoes, carrots, green peas, squash, broccoli, turnip greens, collards, kale, spinach, artichokes, green beans, lima beans, sweet potatoesRich sources of potassium, magnesium, and fiber
Fruits4–56 oz fruit juice; 1 medium fruit; 1/4 C dried fruit; 1/2 C fresh, frozen, or canned fruitApricots, bananas, dates, grapes, oranges, orange juice, grapefruit, grapefruit juice, mangoes, melons, peaches, pineapples, prunes, raisins, strawberries, tangerinesImportant sources of potassium, magnesium, and fiber
Lowfat or fat-free dairy foods2–38 oz milk, 1 C yogurt, 1.5 oz cheeseSkim (fat-free) or 1% (low fat) milk, skim or low fat buttermilk, fat-free or low fat regular or frozen yogurt, low fat and fat-free cheeseMajor sources of calcium and protein
Meats, poultry, and fish2 or less3 oz cooked meats, poultry, or fishSelect only lean; trim away visible fats; broil, roast, or boil, instead of frying; remove skin from poultryRich sources of protein and magnesium
Nuts, seeds, and dry beans4–5/ week1.5 oz or 1/3 C nuts, 1/2 oz or 2 tbsp seeds, 1/2 C dry beansAlmonds, filberts, mixed nuts, peanuts, walnuts, sunflower seeds, kidney beans, lentilsRich sources of energy, magnesium, potassium, protein, and fiber
Fats and oils2–31 tsp soft margarine, 1 Tbsp low fat mayonnaise, 1 tbsp regular salad dressing, 2 tbsp light salad dressing, 1 tsp vegetable oilSoft margarine, low fat mayonnaise, light salad dressing, vegetable oilDASH has 27% of calories as fat, including fat in or added to foods
Sweets5/ week1 tbsp sugar, 1 tbsp jelly or jam, 1/2 oz jelly beans, 8 oz lemonadeMaple syrup, sugar, jelly, jam, fruit-flavored gelatin, jelly beans, hard candy, fruit punch, sorbet, icesSweets should be low in fat
See also: diet