soft drink

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A generic term for a carbonated beverage—commonly called ‘soda’ or ‘pop’—either artificially sweetened with saccharin or aspartame—average < 5 calories—or glucose, fructose—average 170 calories—purchased in cans or bottles or served from a tap
Adverse effects on health—peer-reviewed data: Carbonation is associated with dental erosion, osteoporosis, increased risk of fractures, and kidney stones; the sweeteners are linked to obesity and increased risk of type 2 diabetes

soft drink

A nonalcoholic beverage, typically carbonated and sweetened.
References in periodicals archive ?
You may recall that after saccharin-sweetened diet soft drinks were already on the market, it was demonstrated that rats fed large doses of saccharin were at increased risk of developing bladder cancer.
"Diet Soft Drink Consumption Is Associated With an Increased Risk of Vascular Events in the Northern Manhattan Study." Journal of General Internal Medicine, 2012; DOI: 10.1007/s11606-011-1968-2.
These are the first organic-certified diet soft drinks available in the United States.
Diet soft drinks will remain the dominant market for artificial sweeteners.
Diet soft drink sales, however, continued solid growth.
This chemical alteration results in a product about 600 times sweeter than sugar, so only tiny amounts are needed to make your cup of coffee sweet or a diet soft drink taste like the real thing.
Diet Coke is the drug store shoppers' diet soft drink of choice.
The Calorie Control Council applauded the agency's decision and called it "sweet news" to the 87 million diet soft drink consumers in the United States.
"Our results suggest a potential association between daily diet soft drink consumption and vascular outcomes.
Looking to increase sales of its diet soft drink portfolio, including flagship Diet Coke, the soft drink giant is rolling out new Treat Yourself Light diet beverage merchandising centers to supermarkets, mass merchandisers, and drug stores across America.
If weight loss is your goal, opt for low- or no-calorie beverages such as herbal tea, water, skimmed milk and the occasional diet soft drink.