diatom

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di·a·tom

(dī'ă-tom),
An individual of microscopic unicellular algae, the shells of which comprise a sedimentary infusorial earth.
[G. diatomos, cut in two]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

diatom

(dī′ə-tŏm′)
n.
Any of various microscopic one-celled or colonial heterokonts of the class Bacillariophyceae that are photosynthetic, have a silica cell wall made up of two interlocking parts, and form an important component of phytoplankton.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

diatom

a member of the BACILLARIOPHYCEAE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
These, says Vardi, are what turn the general ROS signal into one that is specific for the perils diatoms face and the responses each evokes.
An unrelated study, UCA-CIDEA (Hernandez, 2002), reported diatoms, amoebae and other organisms in Nicaraguan local estuary systems and fish rearing ponds with prevalence of Bacillariophyceae, Chlorophyceae, Cyanophyceae and Dinoflagellidae species.
As regards carapace roughness, the attachment point theory (Scardino, Harvey, & De Nys, 2006; Scardino, Guenther, & De Nys, 2008) states that substrate roughness constrains the presence of diatoms, depending on their valve size or attachment form.
In experiments, Seminavis robusta diatoms directed their orientation either towards nutrient sources or mating partners, depending on the degree of starvation and the need to mate.
Researchers have previously found that diatoms and sponges (which build their skeletons from silica) gradually buried in ocean sediments since the last ice age have a different silicon isotopic signature to their modern-day relatives.
Three hundred early juvenile abalone (0.015 [+ or -] 0.0002 SE g [abalone.sup.-1]), which only ever had access to diatoms, were sampled before weaning.
Prasad, "All new faces of diatoms: potential source of nanomaterials and beyond," Frontiers in Microbiology, vol.
Diatoms are a highly abundant group of phytoplankton algae in freshwater and marine environments, deep-water and littoral zone of the basin (Round et al.
The involvement of diatoms in the potential ennoblement is however not fully understood because diatom fouling communities and their role in microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) remain poorly documented (see review: [17] and references therein).