dialect

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dialect

Sociology A sublanguage system spoken in a region or by a particular group of people. See Ebonics. Cf Jargon, Slang.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

di·a·lect

(dī'ă-lekt)
The aggregate of generally local shifts in pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary from a perceived less localized standard.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
The dialect is that of the Northwest Midland, scarcely more intelligible to modern readers than Anglo-Saxon, but it indicates that the author belonged to the same border region between England and Wales from which came also Geoffrey of Monmouth and Laghamon, a region where Saxon and Norman elements were mingled with Celtic fancy and delicacy of temperament.
In order to give his language the appearance of antiquity, he rejected every word that was modern, and produced a dialect entirely different from any that had ever been spoken in Great Britain.
It is one thing to make use of the language and sentiments which are common to ourselves and our forefathers, and it is another to invest them with the sentiments and dialect exclusively proper to their descendants.
PESHAWAR -- Research scholars and linguists at a conference on Monday stressed the need for evolving a standard script from all Pashto dialects.
It's been read by millions of readers worldwide in numerous languages, either its original French or one other of the 300 languages or dialects it has been translated into.
As part of a two-year Lost Dialects initiative, visitors to The Word, National Centre for the Written Word, at South Shields, were invited to jot down words and phrases they rarely heard anymore.
The following are among the advantages of the study of provincialisms 1 An acquaintance with their etymology would effectually prevent a very great portion of the unwarrantable, unlearned, sarcastic + sorrowful remarks which are made in reference to those speaking the provincial dialects, and therefore, prevent a great deal of ill-feeling at present produced in society.
Fife goes on to say that "it is fairly entrenched in Welsh spoken minds that the main division is between the gog (north Walian) and the hwntw (south Walian)", before adding that "Welsh as a first language exists in a number of fairly inter-intelligible dialects ...
'I discovered that in the North, South-South, South East, they still cherish and speak their languages and dialects. But here in the South West, we don't speak our language much less our dialects.
Geoffrey Khan, a professor of Hebrew at Cambridge University, has done pioneering work on the spoken Aramaic dialects of the Assyrians and Jews of Iran and northern Iraq.
Time is changing our languages and dialects because of social media and technology.