Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders

(redirected from Diagnostic and Statistical Manual)

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM),

(dī'ag-nos'tic stă-tis'ti-kăl man'yū-ăl men'tăl dis-or'dĕrz),
A system of classification, published by the American Psychiatric Association, which divides recognized mental disorders into clearly defined categories based on sets of objective criteria. Representing a majority view (rather than a consensus) of hundreds of contributors and consultants, DSM is widely recognized as a diagnostic standard and widely used for reporting, coding, and statistical purposes.

The first edition (1952), based on the sixth revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-6), was intended to promote uniformity in the naming and reporting of psychiatric disorders. It contained definitions of all named disorders, but no sets of diagnostic criteria. Although its classification of mental disorders showed the influence of freudian psychoanalysis, its nomenclature (for example, depressive reaction, anxiety reaction, schizophrenic reaction) reflected the theories of Adolf Meyer (1866-1950). The second edition (DSM-II, 1968) preserved the psychoanalytic orientation but dropped the "reaction" terminology. The third edition (DSM-III, 1980) abandoned much of the rigidly psychodynamic thinking of the earlier editions and, for the first time, provided explicit diagnostic criteria and introduced a multiaxial system whereby different aspects of a patient's condition could be separately assessed. Briefly stated, the axes are I, clinical disorders; II, personality disorders and mental retardation; III, general medical disorders; IV, psychosocial and environmental stressors; and V, overall level of functioning. A revised version of the third edition (DSM-IIIR, 1987) incorporated improvements and clarifications. The fourth edition (DSM-IV) appeared in May, 1994. It follows its two predecessors closely in general outline, and like them is coordinated with and partly derived from ICD-9. For many observers, the most significant change in DSM-IV is the renaming of the category formerly called Organic Mental Syndromes and Disorders as Delirium, Dementia, and Amnestic and Other Cognitive Disorders, a shift in terminology intended to avoid the implication that mental disorders in other categories are not organic.

Di·ag·nos·tic and Sta·tis·ti·cal Man·u·al of Men·tal Dis·or·ders

(DSM) (dī-ăg-nos'tik stă-tis'ti-kăl man'yū-ăl men'tăl dis-ōr'dĕrz)
An American Psychiatric Association publication that classifies mental illnesses. Currently in its fourth edition (i.e., DSM-IV-TR), the manual provides health care practitioners with a comprehensive system for diagnosing mental illnesses based on specific ideational and behavioral symptoms.

Di·ag·nos·tic and Sta·tis·ti·cal Man·u·al of Men·tal Dis·or·ders

(dī-ăg-nos'tik stă-tis'ti-kăl man'yū-ăl men'tăl dis-ōr'dĕrz)
A system of classification, published by the American Psychiatric Association, which divides recognized mental disorders into clearly defined categories.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The study, led by researchers from the University of Liverpool, involved a detailed analysis of five key chapters of the latest edition of the widely used Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM), on 'schizophrenia', 'bipolar disorder', 'depressive disorders', 'anxiety disorders' and 'trauma-related disorders'," the site continues.
It has new chapters on the current diagnostic criteria of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders; early identification of autism spectrum disorder; science and pseudoscience, including strategies for advising parents about questionable treatments; case studies; and future directions in the field.
THESE are the nine symptoms of gaming addiction, says the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: |Preoccupation with internet gaming |Withdrawal symptoms such as sadness, anxiety and irritability when internet gaming is taken away |The need to spend more time gaming |Unsuccessful attempts to quit playing |Giving up other activities and loss of interest in previously enjoyed hobbies |Continuing to play despite problems |Deceiving family members or others about the amount of time spent on internet gaming |The use of internet gaming to relieve negative moods, such as guilt or hopelessness |Jeopardising or losing a job or relationship due to internet gaming
It said that in reaching this conclusion, the Supreme Court had disregarded universally recognised diagnostic tools, including the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and jurisprudence under Pakistani case law on mental health, and instead relied upon Indian case law, in particular on a judgment by the Indian Supreme Court on the Hindu Marriage Act regarding dissolution of marriage.
In the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR), (2) HSDD is defined as persistently or recurrently deficient or absent sexual fantasies and desire for sexual activity that cause marked distress or interpersonal difficulty.
The latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) is the product of over 10 years of efforts made by hundreds of internationally renowned experts in diverse fields of mental health.
This handbook is a companion to the latest edition of the American Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.
When the American Psychiatric Association released the fifth edition of its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in May, big changes had already begun in the controversial business of defining mental disorders.
This is the fifth iteration of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, which presents the criteria for the classification and identification of mental disorders and is widely influential in the field and in associated areas concerned with psychiatric classification (e.g., the law).
The latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Illnesses (DSM-5) is obviously big news for mental health professionals, but the manual is raising concerns for the legal industry as well.
New York, Apr 5 ( ANI ): Those who hoped to see sexual fetishes removed completely from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), the bible of psychiatry published by the American Psychiatric Association, will likely be disappointed when the new edition comes out in May.
Full browser ?