diabetic foot infection


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di·a·bet·ic foot in·fec·tion

(dī-ă-bet'ik fut in-fek'shŭn)
Disease of the foot and its digits usually due to diabetes mellitus or other neurologic disorder.
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ULCER DUE TO DIABETIC FOOT INFECTION

diabetic foot infection

A polymicrobial infection of the bones and soft tissues of the lower extremities of patients with diabetes mellitus, typically those patients who have vascular insufficiency or neuropathic foot disease. Eradication of the infection may require prolonged courses of antibiotics, surgical débridement or amputation, or reconstruction or bypass of occluded arteries. Synonym: diabetic foot ulcer See: illustration
See also: infection
References in periodicals archive ?
A study of the microbiology of diabetic foot infections in a teaching hospital in Kuwait.
Professor of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine and Chairman of the Infectious Disease Society of America Guidelines Committee on Diabetic Foot Infection, commented, "I think there is a clear need for a topical antimicrobial compound for treatment of mild diabetic foot infections.
The systematic reviews followed somewhat different methodologies in reaching the same conclusion: The relative efficacy of different antibiotics used in the treatment of diabetic foot infections is unclear, largely because of low-quality evidence, flawed study designs, and bias.
Considering the prevalence of diabetic foot infections and the associated morbidity, the purpose of this case report and discussion is to review pathophysiology and a basic approach to treatment.
Culturing technique is extremely important in cases of diabetic foot infection.
2% fungal infections, and included diabetic foot infections (40.
Validation of the Infectious Diseases Society of America's diabetic foot infection classification system.
Eleven patients were excluded from the study for following reasons: not completing 12 months follow-up period (n=3); exitus due to a reason other than diabetic foot infection (n=1) major lower extremity amputation due to rapid disease progression (n=7).
This is the largest and most comprehensive randomized controlled trial of treatment of moderate to severe diabetic foot infection to date, and the only one with a double-blind design.
Almost 80% of these patients have a diabetic foot infection.