dextran

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Related to Dexferrum: Imferon

dextran

 [dek´stran]
a water-soluble polysaccharide of glucose produced by the action of Leuconostoc mesenteroides on sucrose; used as an artificial plasma extender.

dex·tran

(deks'tran),
1. Any of several water-soluble high molecular weight glucose polymers (ranging between MW 1,000 and 40,000,000); produced by the action of members of the family Lactobacillaceae and certain other microorganisms on sucrose; used in isotonic sodium chloride solution for the treatment of shock, and in distilled water for the relief of the edema of nephrosis; lower molecular weight dextran (for example, MW 40,000 designated as dextran 40) improves blood flow in areas of stasis by reducing cellular aggregation.
See also: dextransucrase.
2. α-1,6-glucan with branch points (1,2; 1,3; 1,4) that are spaced in a manner characteristic of the individual species; used as plasma substitutes or expanders.
See also: dextransucrase.

dextran

(dĕk′străn′, -strən)
n.
Any of a group of branched polysaccharides with various molecular weights that are used to prevent thrombosis, as plasma volume expanders, and as food additives.

dextran

Transfusion medicine Dextran-40, dextran-70, dextran-1 A colloid-type volume expander consisting of a large glycogen-like molecules which may occasionally be used in surgical blood management by hemodilution; these substances have the desired properties of being viscid, and gelatinous, resulting in oncotic pressure to retain fluids in vessels; they are widely used as replacement fluids and volume expanders Pros ↓ Allogeneic transfusions, ↓ postoperative bleeding, ↓ blood viscosity Cons Interferes with platelet and RBC function, crossmatching; may cause anaphylaxis and peripheral edema. See Colloid solutions, Crystalloids, Hemodilution, Surgical blood management.

dex·tran

(deks'tran)
Any of several water-soluble high molecular weight glucose polymers; used in isotonic sodium chloride solution for the treatment of shock, and in distilled water for the relief of the edema of nephrosis; lower molecular weight dextran.
See also: dextransucrase

dex·tran

(deks'tran)
Any of several water-soluble high molecular weight glucose polymers; used in isotonic sodium chloride solution to treat shock and to relieve edema of nephrosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first, a moderate reaction, was judged to be related to Dexferrum, while the second, a cardiac arrest, was judged not to be related.
The adverse event associated with Dexferrum therapy occurred in an 84-year-old, white, male with a history of coronary artery disease.
A cardiac arrest that was judged to have been related to a primary cardiac ischemic event rather than to Dexferrum occurred in a 68-year-old, white, male with a history of diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, cardiomyopathy, severe left ventricular dysfunction (he had an implanted pacemaker), and a history of recent sepsis.
Overall, no patient developed anaphylactic reactions or associated reactions, such as dyspepsia, dyspnea/wheezing, headache, nausea/vomiting, skin flushing, or swelling, that were associated with Dexferrum therapy.
Our 6-month retrospective study revealed that adverse events occurred in 3.2% of hemodialysis patients treated with Dexferrum. Excluding the event judged to be unrelated to iron dextran administration, only 1 patient in our series, or 1.6%, experienced an adverse reaction associated with Dexferrum.
Due to the small number of events that occurred in this series of patients treated with Dexferrum, analysis of potential predictors of adverse reactions would not have been meaningful.