deviant

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deviant

 [de´ve-ant]
1. varying from a determinable standard.
2. a person with characteristics varying from what is considered standard or normal.
sexual deviant a person exhibiting sexual deviation.

de·vi·ant

(dē'vē-ant),
1. Denoting or indicative of deviation. Synonym(s): aberrant (3) , abnormal (2) Compare: normal.
2. A person exhibiting deviation, especially sexual.

de·vi·ant

(dē'vē-ănt)
1. Denoting or indicative of deviation.
2. An individual exhibiting deviation, especially sexual.
References in periodicals archive ?
The panel chairman Tricia Stewart said: "Dr Doyle was well known as chairperson of the Dumfries and Galloway LGBT+ Group and considered the word 'deviant' referred to her sexuality.
'The Deviants took so much stick for being musically incompetent, especially from the prog guys, but now it seems, in retrospect, we were actually doing a lot of things right.'
The Standard Deviants English Grammar Action Learning CD-ROM, written by instructors at George Mason University and The Madeira School, is designed to help students understand the parts of speech, verb tenses, nouns, phrases, participles, and most other basic grammar topics.
Most recently Albert Finney gave us a reprise of the homosexual as a desperately lonely deviant in A Man of No Importance (1994), and he is joined by the killers in Looking for Mr.
One approach constructs Sutherland's theory as exclusively one of attitude transference; that is, people acquire definitions legitimizing crime through contact with offenders who communicate attitudes and motives that condone criminal or deviant activities (e.g.
Of course, little is more deviant than a poor black person in America, and in all the opinion-mongering about the second Rodney King verdict and what's to be done in our inner cities, much of the focus was on the sickness of the black mind.
Seldom do social scientists accomplish rich ethnographic and longitudinal research of secretive and powerful deviant occupations such as upper-level drug dealing and smuggling, and rarer still do scholars craft such gems of lucid and intriguing reading.
Characterizing it as an alternative both to Weber's "rationalization" and Elias's "process of civilization," Finzsch offers a further distinction between Oestreich's concept and the modern sociologist's concept of "social control." As Finzsch explains, "'Social control' denotes much more the dissonance of acts defined as 'deviant' from predefined behavior, whereas 'social discipline' refers to a historical development that tries to minimize exactly this dissonance."
He said society, especially its legal institutions such as mosques, should play an important role in confronting deviant thoughts and ideas.
Nevertheless, Scott Seomin from the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation said gay people have no reason to worry about Rhea comparing them to anything deviant.
We should also protect our young people from the reach of the proponents of deviant ideologies before they are influenced by them." The minister underlined the role of the society in countering extremism.
Data reveal that as good deviants we are engaging in the deviant behavior of voting.