developmental disability

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disability

 [dis″ah-bil´ĭ-te]
1. impairment of function to below the maximal level, either physically or mentally.
2. anything that causes such impairment.
3. the United States Government defines a disability as “a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more of an individual's major life activities:” this includes both those individuals with a record of an impairment and those regarded as having such an impairment.
4. the World Health Organization defines disability as loss of function at the level of the whole person, which may include inability to communicate or to perform mobility, activities of daily living, or necessary vocational or avocational activities; rehabilitation is aimed at teaching patients to remediate or compensate and thus maximize functional independence. See also handicap and impairment.
developmental disability a substantial handicap in mental or physical functioning, with onset before the age of 18 and of indefinite duration. Examples are autism, cerebral palsy, uncontrolled epilepsy, certain other neuropathies, and mental retardation.

de·vel·op·men·tal dis·a·bil·i·ty

loss of function brought on by prenatal and postnatal events in which the predominant disturbance is in the acquisition of cognitive, language, motor, or social skills; for example, mental retardation, autistic disorder, learning disorder, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

developmental disability

n.
A physical, cognitive, or emotional impairment, often caused by a neurodevelopmental disorder such as cerebral palsy or autism spectrum disorder, that appears early in life and limits a person's ability to learn, communicate, or perform one or more activities of daily life.

developmental disability (DD)

a pathological condition that starts developing before 18 years of age. Most developmental disabilities persist throughout the individual's life, although many can be effectively treated. See also congenital anomaly.

de·vel·op·men·tal dis·a·bil·ity

(dĕ-vel'ŏp-men'tăl dis'ă-bil'i-tē)
Loss of function brought on by prenatal and postnatal events in which the predominant disturbance is in the acquisition of cognitive, language, motor, or social skills; e.g., mental retardation, autistic disorder, learning disorder, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

de·vel·op·men·tal dis·a·bil·ity

(dĕ-vel'ŏp-men'tăl dis'ă-bil'i-tē)
Loss of function brought on by prenatal and postnatal events in which the predominant disturbance is in the acquisition of cognitive, language, motor, or social skills.

Patient discussion about developmental disability

Q. Is pervasive developmental disorder (PDD) or autism is fatal……what exactly it is……?

A. Autism is not fatal in its symptom and progression but it can become fatal as it does impair normal physiological function it CAN BE a fatal condition. It’s a group of illness which involves delays in the development of basic skills. It happens to children below age 3. It affects the child`s ability to communicate and interact. Autism affected children are also found to be mentally retarded.

More discussions about developmental disability
References in periodicals archive ?
Jesus Morales, who is legally blind and developmentally disabled, is studying art at Valley College, which in concert with the Tierra del Sol Foundation runs a program that now helps 30 students with developmental disabilities.
Clients without that family support would slip into crisis, which would move them to the front of the line for services," said Ring, also the parent of a developmentally disabled son.
The article raised all the right issues about the sexual rights of developmentally disabled people.
Others charged that they themselves could not find a sex-free home for their own developmentally disabled children.
The non-profit found a source of income and, just as importantly, a project in which to engage the skills of its developmentally disabled workforce.
8220;The Foundation for the Developmentally Disabled is committed to ensuring that people with developmental disabilities and their families have the support they need to be full members of the community,” Goldman said.
These patterns are demonstrated as part of a repertoire by those who are developmentally disabled.
Most of these people will be considered developmentally disabled by the mental health service delivery system, which has a vested interest as well.
Sue Heckler and Susan Golec of Developmental Enterprises Corporation, the largest provider of vocational and habilitation services for developmentally disabled adults in Montgomery County, have accepted invitations to speak at the World Congress on Disabilities, meeting Nov.
is pleased to announce that Richard Mancini, an attorney in the firm's Bonita Springs office, was re-elected to a second term as President of the Foundation for the Developmentally Disabled in Naples.
Last year, 30 projects were held locally benefiting organizations such as Carousel Ranch, Bridgeport Elementary School, Boys & Girls Club, East Rice Canyon state park and LARC Ranch, a home for developmentally disabled adults.

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