detritus

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detritus

 [de-tri´tus]
particulate matter produced by or remaining after the wearing away or disintegration of a substance or tissue.

de·tri·tus

(dē-trī'tŭs), Avoid the mispronunciation det'ritus.
Any broken-down material, carious or gangrenous matter, gravel, etc.
[L. (see detrition)]

detritus

/de·tri·tus/ (de-tri´tus) particulate matter produced by or remaining after the wearing away or disintegration of a substance or tissue.

de·tri·tus

(dĕ-trī'tŭs)
Any broken-down material, carious or gangrenous matter, or gravel.

detritus

any organic debris.

de·tri·tus

(dĕ-trī'tŭs)
Any broken-down material, carious or gangrenous matter, or gravel.

detritus (det´ritus),

n the fragments or scraps that cling to teeth, gingival tissues or other oral surfaces.

detritus

particulate matter produced by or remaining after the wearing away or disintegration of a substance or tissue.

detritus cysts
occur in arthritis where there is hemorrhage and necrotic bone.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Cati basin is covered by Quaternary detritic sediments, mainly alluvial fans that are slightly incised (Simon, 1984; Perea, 2006).
This fault is located along the southern front of the El Cid range, where Mesozoic detritic and carbonate rocks are exposed.
P1 Assemblage come from red ferruginous detritic limestones, probably deposited in slightly more "epicontinental" conditions than the ferruginous silty limestones with Fe-oolites from which MT1 assemblage comes.
The term "Permotrias" was frequently used to name the red detritic sequences which make up the greater part of the Permian and the base of the Triassic.
The deposits are of very variable thickness (from a few metres to more than two thousand metres), always continental, usually red and detritic, as conglomerates, sandstones and clays.
At the extreme east, they began in the Anisian, and the central part in the upper Ladinian; the extreme western part did not become covered by sea waters and the detritic sedimentation continued throughout all of the Triassic.
Some grey-black detritic material in which alternating layers containing Autunian and Stephanian flora have been found in a disused coal mine.
Directly above, lying on an important, unconformity there are red detritic materials from the Middle Triassic (Ladinian).
In the western part of the Iberian Range the detritic deposits are more abundant and the Lower and Middle Triassic show Buntsandstein facies.
The Permian sedimentation begins in well-individualised depressions filled up with red detritic materials with numerous hiatus and internal unconformities, a testimony to the synsedimentary tectonic activity of the faults defining them.
In all of these, the sequences are composed primarily of carbonate rocks of marine origin while detritic levels are scarce or completely absent.
The lower is a complex detritic deposit in small tectonic depressions active during sedimentation.