descendant

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descendant

(dĭ-sĕn′dənt)
n.
One whose descent can be traced to a particular individual or group: a descendant of Queen Victoria; descendants of a prize-winning horse.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ben Vinson and Mathew Restall document the existence of Black participation in the settlement process and the incorporation of Africans and their descendents within militia groups aimed at domestic defense (2000, 2001).
The descendents of Birmingham Middlemore Children have found an ally over here in the form of Birmingham City Councillor Reg Corns, who has campaigned tirelessly for the apology and access to family records.
His next challenge is to bike from New York across North America, raising the profile of his work and taking photos of Welsh descendents, before biking back to Patagonia.
Freemen are the descendents of the merchants, traders and craftsmen of medieval England and Wales.
I presume the visitors to the farm were descendents of Mrs Astley although they could be related to other children of Evan and Charlotte.
They said too much time had passed and most of the claims lacked the factual basis to qualify as genuine issues for trial, and according to Alberta's statute of limitations, the Papachase descendents are now barred from launching a civil lawsuit.
2601-1(b) (1)(i); thus, it assessed a GSTT deficiency of $1,144,465, arguing that the exercise of the decedent's GPA in favor of a trust for the benefit of her grandchildren and more remote descendents was a "direct skip" under Sec.
Now it is up to Lucy and her friends to destroy Dracula and his descendents so that everyone can live in peace.
And while such eclecticism is certainly no mean feat, by restaging historical models, Beech unwittingly only replaces the originals' resonance with the self-conscious "difference" of their descendents.
Descendents of the island incorporated African, West Indian, British, Caribbean, Portuguese, and Native American customs, and now Bermuda's heritage thrives from the preservation of these traditions.
We know from Proust and elsewhere that the descendents of the salon continued on into the belle epogue, but they were fatally corrupted by the growth of a star system based (horrors) on celebrity, a trend begun in the 1830s, and on the waning financial and cultural resources of the old aristocracy.