Dermacentor

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Dermacentor

 [der″mah-sen´ter]
a genus of ticks parasitic on various animals, and vectors of disease-producing microorganisms.
Dermacentor anderso´ni a species of tick common in the western United States, parasitic on numerous wild mammals, most domestic animals, and humans. It is a vector of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tularemia, Colorado tick fever, and Q fever in the United States, and is the cause of tick paralysis.
Dermacentor varia´bilis the chief vector of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in the central and eastern United States, the dog being the principal host of the adult forms, but also parasitic on cattle, horses, rabbits, and humans.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Dermacentor

(der'mă-sen'tŏr),
An ornate, characteristically marked genus of hard ticks (family Ixodidae) that possess eyes and 11 festoons; it consists of some 20 species the members of which commonly attack dogs, humans, and other mammals.
[derm- + G. kentōr, a goader]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Der·ma·cen·tor

(dĕr-mă-sen'tōr)
An ornate, characteristically marked genus of hard ticks (family Ixodidae) that possess eyes and 11 festoons; it consists of some 20 species with members that commonly attack dogs, humans, and other mammals.
[derm- + G. kentōr, a goader]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
1989: Evaluation of random sampling for estimating density of winter tick (Dermacentor albipictus) on moose (Alces alces) hides.--International Journal of Parasitology 19(6): 691-693.
1991: Suitability of moose, elk, mule deer, and white-tailed deer for hosts of winter ticks (Dermacentor albipictus).--Canadian Journal of Zoology 69: 2300-2305.
Reproduction of the winter tick, Dermacentor albipictus, under field conditions in Alberta, Canada.
Climbing simulated vegetation to heights of ungulate hosts by larvae of the winter tick, Dermacentor albipictus (Packard) (Acari: Ixodidae).
Water balance attributes for off-host survival in larvae of the winter tick (Dermacentor albipictus) from wild moose.
23 (Click beetle) Scopulariopsis brevicaulis Dermacentor albipictus 11903 (Winter tick) Fungus and isolate# Origin Deposited Beauveria bassiana France, Europe ARSEF (1) 149 Beauveria caledonica Kentucky, USA UAMH (2) 11821 Metarhizium anisopliae North Carolina, USA ARSEF 23 Scopulariopsis brevicaulis New Hampshire, USA UAMH 11903 (1) ARSEF, USDA-ARS Collection of Entomopathogenic Fungal Cultures, Ithaca, New York, USA.
Off-host survival and reproductive success of adult female winter ticks, Dermacentor albipictus in seven habitat types of central Alberta.
A local outbreak of the winter or moose tick, Dermacentor albipictus Pack.
The winter tick, Dermacentor albipictus (Packard, 1869) on moose Alces alces (L.) of central Alberta.
In a comprehensive study including habitat use (Scarpitti 2006) and age-specific mortality rates, they concluded that epizootics of winter ticks (Dermacentor albipictus) caused periodic, annual high mortality in calves and lower fecundity in yearlings.
Growth of moose calves (Alces alces americana) infested and uninfested with winter ticks (Dermacentor albipictus).
Research should address impacts of parasitism by winter tick (Dermacentor albipictus) and brain-worm (Parelaphostrongylus tennis) on productivity and mortality of moose, influence of climate change on population dynamics and range, and conflicts in areas with high human population density.