asylum

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a·sy·lum

(ă-sī'lŭm),
Older term for an institution for the housing and care of those who by reason of age or of mental or bodily infirmities are unable to care for themselves.
[L. fr. G. asylon, a sanctuary, fr. a- priv. + sylē, right of seizure]

asylum

Global village
Protection given by a state (country) to a foreign person fleeing persecution in his or her own country. Asylum is given under the 1951 United Nations Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees; to be recognised as a refugee, one must have left his or country and be unable to go back because he or she has a well-founded fear of persecution.

Medical history
An obsolete term for a healthcare facility for patients who are unable to care for themselves; e.g., institution. The choice of appropriate equivalent term for asylum is based on the nature of the underlying condition: for example, if the condition is mental, it may be designated as a psychiatric inpatient facility; if the institutionalisation is for a terminal physical condition (e.g., AIDS or cancer) it is termed hospice.

a·sy·lum

(ă-sī'lŭm)
Facility dedicated for the relief of care of the destitute or sick, especially those with mental illness.
[L. fr. G. asylon, a sanctuary, fr. a- priv. + sylē, right of seizure]

asylum

A once compassionate but now pejorative term for a psychiatric hospital or an institution for the care of the elderly and infirm.
References in periodicals archive ?
2004) ("Such claims for 'derivative asylum' based on potential harm to an applicant's children are cognizable only when the applicant's children are subject to 'constructive deportation' along with the applicant....
However, the converse is not true; there is no statutory basis for a grant of derivative asylum status to a parent based on the grant of asylum to his child.
at 312 ("[U]nder [section] l158(b)(3)(A), an individual whose spouse or parent has been granted asylum on the basis of having undergone or been threatened with the prospect of a forced abortion or sterilization is automatically eligible for derivative asylum: '[a] spouse or child ...
(238) But see Nortick, supra note 49, at 2191 ("The United States should extend derivative asylum rights to Chinese nationals fleeing the one-child policy, regardless of marital status."); see also Rabkin, supra note 2, at 992 ("The BIA should ...