morpheme

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Related to Derivational morpheme: Inflectional morpheme

mor·pheme

(mōr'fēm),
The smallest linguistic unit with a meaning.
[G. morphē, form + -eme, from phoneme, G. phēmē, utterance]

morpheme

The smallest semantically meaningful unit of a spoken language (words, prefixes or suffixes) that have discrete meanings. The formal study of morphemes is termed morphology.

morpheme

(mor'fem)
The smallest meaningful grammatical unit in a language (e.g., the s in “beds”).
See: phoneme

morpheme

The smallest element of speech that conveys either factual or grammatical information. Compare with phoneme which is a speech sound that serves to distinguish one word from another.
References in periodicals archive ?
Just two noun show -enger-, namely plural Layer I marker in derivational morpheme, and one in -aker- with feminine singular Layer I marker, the rest is -(e)sker-.
Namely, the omission of derivational morphemes on nonfinal conjuncts is strictly prohibited.
Figure 1, adapted from Goksel (2001), shows the schema for possible morpheme slots available for verbs (excluding derivational morphemes that may immediately follow the verb root) in main clauses.
When we look at other types of nonverbal constructions that involve the coordination of Noun Phrases, the morphological wordhood of non-final conjuncts also holds to be a crucial requirement for the suspension of all nominal affixes except for (i) derivational morphemes, and (ii) the possessive when it co-occurs with the plural morpheme.
Linguists would rather refer to {ility} as attached to "compres-si-ble", or, to be in agreement with the general opinion, they would regard "bility" as representing two derivational morphemes, i.
One would rather think not in terms of two (different) types of derivational morphemes but in terms of a continuum, which will, easily and satisfactorily enough, embrace all the complex forms discussed here above.
Nevertheless, the idea of distinctions between respective derivational morphemes being viewed as gradual and representing a continuum is welcomed.
Although the semantic map methodology has not been applied to the analysis of word formation patterns, there is no reason to suppose that derivational morphemes behave differently from grammatical morphemes.
Derivational morphemes are in a certain sense midway between lexical and grammatical morphemes.
The difference between derivation and inflection is indeed not a radical one, and, as we have just stated, it lies precisely in the compulsory character of grammatical morphemes as opposed to derivational morphemes.
The first constraint, namely the Free Morpheme Constraint, prevents mixing of bound inflectional or derivational morphemes, whereas the second constraint, namely the Equivalence Constraint, does not allow mixing in environments where the surface structures of two languages involved differ.
Preroot derivational morphemes in Tagalog exhibit qualities that should compel us to classify them as prefixes.