sensory deprivation

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deprivation

 [dep-rĭ-va´shun]
loss or absence of parts, organs, powers, or things that are needed.
emotional deprivation deprivation of adequate and appropriate interpersonal or environmental experience, usually in the early developmental years.
maternal deprivation the result of premature loss or absence of the mother or of lack of proper mothering; see also maternal deprivation syndrome.
sensory deprivation a condition in which an individual receives less than normal sensory input. It can be caused by physiological, motor, or environmental disruptions. Effects include boredom, irritability, difficulty in concentrating, confusion, and inaccurate perception of sensory stimuli. Auditory and visual hallucinations and disorientation in time and place indicate perceptual distortions due to sensory deprivation. Symptoms can be produced by solitary confinement, loss of sight or hearing, paralysis, and even by ordinary hospital bed rest.
sleep deprivation a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as prolonged periods of time without sleep (sustained, natural, periodic suspension of relative consciousness).
thought deprivation blocking (def. 2).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sen·so·ry dep·ri·va·tion

diminution or absence of usual external stimuli or perceptual experiences, commonly resulting in psychological distress and aberrant functioning if continued too long.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sensory deprivation

n.
Deprivation of external sensory stimulation, as by prolonged isolation.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

sensory deprivation

Pseudomedicine
The elimination of virtually all external auditory, sensory and visual stimuli, which can be accomplished by immersing oneself in luke-warm water in a flotation tank, or in an isolation (dry) chamber. Advocates of this form of pseudotherapy believe it to be useful for increasing self-awareness; it is also used by those who wish to enhance the intensity of meditation.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

sen·so·ry dep·ri·va·tion

(sen'sŏr-ē dep'ri-vā'shŭn)
Diminution or absence of usual external stimuli or perceptual experiences, commonly resulting in psychological distress and aberrant functioning if continued too long.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sensory deprivation

The effecting of a major reduction in incoming sensory information. Sensory deprivation is damaging because the body depends for its normal functioning on constant stimulation. Sensory deprivation early in life is the most damaging of all and can lead to severe retardation and permanent malfunctioning of the deprived modality.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Sensory deprivation

A situation where an individual finds himself in an environment without sensory cues. Also, (used here) the act of shutting one's senses off to outside sensory stimuli to achieve hallucinatory experiences and/or to observe the psychological results.
Mentioned in: Hallucinations
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

deprivation, sensory

The condition produced by a loss of all or most of the stimulation from the visual, auditory, tactile and other sensory systems. Often, deprivation involves only one modality (e.g. vision). Methods used for deprivation include diffusing goggles, white noise, padded gloves, etc. Its effect has shown the necessity of continuous sensory activity to maintain the normal development and functioning of any sensory system.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann