depressive episode


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depressive episode

1. a manifestation of a major mood disorder involving an enduring period of some or all of the following signs: significant sadness, tearfulness, decreased appetite, weight loss, sleep and energy disturbance, psychomotor agitation or retardation, feelings of worthlessness, guilt, helplessness, hopelessness, decreased concentration, thoughts of death, and suicidal ideation.
See also: major depression, bipolar disorder, affective disorders. Compare: manic episode.
2. a DSM diagnosis that is established when specified criteria are met.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Daily intake of nutritional supplements over a year does not effectively prevent the onset of a major depressive episode in this sample.
The median age's at the interview, 1st mood (depressive or manic or hypomanic) episode, 1st depressive episode, most severe depressive episode for the BID group was early than MDD group.
The age at first episode (t=-0.059, p=0.953), total number of episodes (Z= -1.019, p= 0.308), number of manic episodes (Z= -1.373, p= 0.17), and the PHQ-9 score during depressive episode (t=1.177, p=0.241) had no statistically significant differences.
This study was designed to study pattern of cognitive impairment after TIVA and GA for ECT in patient with severe depressive episode. The purported significance of this study is that if it proves that administration of TIVA is better than GA for ECT, it will enable us to prevent significant impairment and prolonged hospital stays as well as avoid unnecessary economic burden to patient.
Whereas many therapists prefer not to treat a pregnant woman or to stop the treatment during pregnancy, a depressive episode left untreated can have negative effects on the foetus.
Lubitz had been flying on a medical certificate that contained a waiver because of a severe depressive episode from August 2008 to July 2009.
The correlation between substance abuse disorders and mental health issues continues to rise, according to the survey, as approximately 271,000 adolescents who reported having a substance abuse disorder suffered severe impairment from their major depressive episode.
In them, he told the school he had suffered a "serious depressive episode".
The primary outcome of the interest was remission of the major depressive episode after 12, 26 and 52 weeks of treatment.
Sixty (83.3%) patients were experiencing their first depressive episode. Precipitating factors were present in 35 (48.6%) subjects, and absent in 37 (51.4%) subjects.
* In 2012, there were 2.2 million youths aged 12 to 17 (9.1 percent) who had a major depressive episode (MDE) during the past year.