ozone depletion

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ozone depletion

The ongoing reduction of ozone in the stratosphere. Ozone (O3) is present in 1 ppm in the upper stratosphere, and it absorbs virtually all of the UV radiation from the sun; increased rates of sun-induced malignancies (e.g., melanomas) have been attributed to the destruction of the ozone layer. Ozone depletion is caused by the release of chloride ions from CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) after release from air conditioners, spray cans, and manufacturing plants that produce electronics and plastics. CFCs degrade in the atmosphere, release chlorine and cause ozone destruction, remain free, or react with ozone to form ClO (chlorine monoxide); O3 is being depleted at a rate of 4–5% per decade.
References in periodicals archive ?
Depletion of Ozone Layer, he said, was one of the most serious environmental concerns threatening the very existence of life on earth.
NASA and NOAA have a mandate under the Clean Air Act to monitor ozone-depleting gases and stratospheric depletion of ozone.
So we took out a rally to create awareness among people telling them how important trees are for us and how important it is to protect our ecosystem as global warming is increasing and also there is depletion of ozone layer," said Khyatri Chawda, student.
This depletion of ozone has shifted the Southern Hemisphere's climate so that dry areas in the subtropics now see about 10 percent more precipitation in summer than they used to, scientists reported in the journal Science.
MoE Secretary Muhammad Javed Malik said depletion of Ozone layer was a serious global issue equally important like other environmental problems such as pollution, drought and desertification, loss of forests, disposal of solid and liquid wastes and loss of biodiversity.
The depletion of ozone is also cooling the stratosphere over Antarctica, where the temperature has fallen by 7[degrees]C.
The Green-house effect and depletion of ozone were hot topics given to me during my school days for any competition in the early 1990s.
The best-known examples are the depletion of ozone in the upper atmosphere and climatic warming.
The depletion of ozone in the stratosphere, which is a consequence caused by chlorofluorocarbons and other chemicals being emitted into the atmosphere, also can reduce upper-air temperatures.
The energy rules also have been particularly controversial because the industry's most efficient chemical for insulation, HCFC-141b, has been linked to depletion of ozone, and the Environmental Protection Agency has banned it after 2003.
Because ozone absorbs ultraviolet (UV) light, the depletion of ozone can cause the atmosphere to cool.