deontology

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de·on·tol·o·gy

(dē'on-tol'ŏ-jē),
The study of professional ethics and duties.
[G. deon (deont-), that which is binding, pr. part. ntr. of dei, (impers.) it behooves, fr. deō, to bind, + logos, study]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

deontology

(de?on-tol'o-je) [Gr. deonta, needful, + logos, word, reason]
System of ethical decision making that is based on moral rules and unchanging principles.
See: ethics
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
It is, in Thomas Kuhn's sense, a paradigm shift and has led and will lead to a struggle of minds and morals between those committed to the older deontological ethics and those committed to the renewed virtue ethics.
In contrast to deontological ethics, which state that actions are right that adhere to an ethical code, consequentialist ethics dictate that actions are ethical that lead to some good consequence.
While the concept of efficient breach can be squared with deontological ethics, accordingly, it cannot be squared with virtue ethics unless one is prepared to argue that seeking efficiency is a virtue, or at least that it is not a vice.
(Steiner & Steiner, 2006) Similarly, her Questions 5 and 11: "What is your intention in making this decision?" and "What is the symbolic potential of your action if understood or misunderstood?" suggest Immanuel Kant's Categorical Imperative, which is the central philosophical concept in modern deontological ethics: "Act only according to that maxim by which you can at the same time will that it should become a universal law." (Steiner & Steiner, 2006) Again, "Could you disclose without qualm your decision or action to your boss, your CEO, the board of directors, your family, society as a whole?" (Question 10) involves the same ethical dimension suggested by the Conventionalist Ethic, the Disclosure Rule, and the Intuition Ethic.
This collection of classic and contemporary readings in ethics presents sharp, competing views on a wide range of fundamentally important topics including moral relativism and objectivism, ethical egoism, value theory, utilitarianism, deontological ethics, virtue ethics, ethics and religion, and applied ethics.
Pratt & James (1994) have argued against Bishop and declared a need for a more rigid set of deontological ethics and mentioned this laxness of rules as the reason for the advertising industry's poor, non credible ima ge, which it has been suffering for years.
Here one might have expected May to gear the discussion towards Kantian, or even Rawlsian, deontological ethics, in order to emphasize the universality of humane treatment of those vulnerable individuals caught up as prisoners of war.
The examination will be based on a theoretical framework that suggests that the transformational leadership style involves a significant level of deontological ethics and demonstrates a moral integrity type, the transactional leadership style has significant levels of teleological ethics and an intellectual integrity type.
Likewise, to generate the teleological ethics scores, a response to each of the 21 ethics questions was assigned a "1" if the response indicated agreement with teleological ethics and a "0" if the response indicated agreement with deontological ethics. The teleological ethics score for each participant was the sum of the scores across the 21 ethics questions.
Doing one's duty is central in deontological ethics. And by "duty" deontologists usually mean that one's behavior is permitted or demanded by a first principle or general rule regarding morality, such as "Thou shall not lie," or "Honor thy father and mother." These rules are often portrayed as being self-evident.
It probes the non-consequentialist's perspective or deontological ethics, which highlights Finding the appropriate principle(s) of morality to guide ethical acts through doing one's duty rather than having an inclination.
The division between teleological and deontological ethics theories reminds us that we do not always know the full consequences of out actions.