deontologism

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deontologism

[dē′ontol′əgiz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, deon, obligation, logos, science
a doctrine of ethics that states that moral duty or obligation is binding even though a moral action may be different or result in painful consequences, also, that what makes acts right are nonconsequential characteristics such as fidelity, veracity, justice, and honesty. Compare natural law, utilitarianism.
References in periodicals archive ?
5), a deontological ethic grounded in the idea of following a predefined set of moral rules because of those rules.
See Larry Alexander & Michael Moore, Deontological Ethics, THE STANFORD ENCYCLOPEDIA OF PHILOSOPHY (Edward N.
Likewise, to generate the teleological ethics scores, a response to each of the 21 ethics questions was assigned a "1" if the response indicated agreement with teleological ethics and a "0" if the response indicated agreement with deontological ethics.
It probes the non-consequentialist's perspective or deontological ethics, which highlights Finding the appropriate principle(s) of morality to guide ethical acts through doing one's duty rather than having an inclination.
The division between teleological and deontological ethics theories reminds us that we do not always know the full consequences of out actions.
The exemplary advocate of secular deontological ethics is Immanuel
According to them, moral values are fundamentally heterogeneous, and, as such, consequentialism (from which the utility principle proceeds) and deontological ethics constitute the two complementary branches of a whole global study of our moral reasons to act.
Rule-based thinking is deontological ethics, associated with Immanuel Rant (1724-1804).
Deontological ethics attempt to determine only what is correct but do not provide guides about how to live a happy life.
Some, like Realism, are traditions of political thought; others, like deontological ethics, are categories of moral philosophy.
In strict deontological ethics, certain standards of conduct can never be broken, even when obeying them might cause someone grief or when breaking them once or twice (as in telling a white lie) might bring a person happiness.