restoration

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Related to Dental restoration: indirect restoration

restoration

 [res″to-ra´shun]
1. induction of a return to a previous state, as a return to health or replacement of a part to normal position.
3. partial or complete reconstruction of a body part.
4. the device used for such a reconstruction.
oral health restoration in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as promotion of healing for a patient who has an oral mucosa or dental lesion.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

res·to·ra·tion

(res'tō-rā'shŭn), In dentistry:
1. A prosthetic restoration or appliance; a broad term applied to any inlay, crown, bridge, partial denture, or complete denture that restores or replaces lost tooth structure, teeth, or oral tissues.
2. A plug or stopping; any substance (for example, gold, amalgam) used for restoring the portion missing from a tooth as a result of removing decay in the tooth.
[L. restauro, pp. -atus, to restore, to repair]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

res·to·ra·tion

(res'tŏr-ā'shŭn)
1. dentistry A prosthetic restoration or appliance; a broad term applied to any inlay, crown, bridge, partial denture, or complete denture that restores or replaces lost tooth structure, teeth, or oral tissues.
2. A plug or stopping; any substance, such as gold or amalgam, used for restoring the portion missing from a tooth as a result of the removal of decay from the tooth.
[L. restauro, pp. -atus, to restore, to repair]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

res·to·ra·tion

(res'tŏr-ā'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, prosthetic restoration or appliance; broad term applied to any inlay, crown, bridge, partial denture, or complete denture that restores or replaces lost tooth structure, teeth, or oral tissues.
2. A plug or stopper; any substance (e.g., gold, amalgam) used for restoring missing portion of a tooth as a result of removing decay in tooth.
[L. restauro, pp. -atus, to restore, to repair]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about restoration

Q. What are the opportunities to restore gums? My gum on the lower jaw gets less and less, opening the roots of my teeth. Is there any technology or recurement to stop it and, hopefully, draw back?

A. Treatment of receding gums start with treating the cause - improving overall oral hygiene, including brushing habits (too powerful brushing may damage the gums), as well as periodic tooth cleaning at the dentist.

More sever situation may necessitate treatments done by a dentist. Consulting one may be wise.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/imagepages/1136.htm

More discussions about restoration
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References in periodicals archive ?
The survey included 100 subjects (n=100) based on the knowledge and awareness on various dental restorations and prosthesis for anterior teeth.
Severe dermatitis might be caused by cross reaction between nickel and palladium and dental amalgam resolved following removal of dental restorations. 2017 Apr 12;5(6)795-800.
On average, a dental restoration lasts five to 10 or so years before needing replacement.
A relational trend is present in the analysis of patient age and replacement rates of dental restoration. As patients age, there is a shift from initial placement of restorations to replacement of restorations.
The modern restorative philosophy of so called 'Microdentistry' is based on both preservation of the healthy dental structure and removal of the carious tissue only, thus minimising the need for strengthening and retaining the dental restoration. For this reason, new techniques and equipment have been available on the market such as the air abrasion system, which has been subjected to further research and to a wider application [Rosenberg, 1995].
We report the development of subcutaneous emphysema in a middle-aged woman that occurred several hours after she had undergone a dental restoration procedure.
"The use of CAD/CAM for producing dental restoration represents the most sophisticated use of computers in dentistry so far," says Jack D.
Ceramics as biomaterials for dental restoration. Expert RevMed Devices 2008;5:729-45.
This syndrome typically does not affect healthy teeth, but can cause problems for those with gum disease, dental infections, decay, abscesses, and failing or incomplete dental restoration work.
The growing options for dental restoration within private industry will also become a growing trend for Army consumers in the years to come.
Among the applications: drug and protein delivery, bone grafting and tissue engineering, dental restoration and bone replacement, and sensor technology, to name a few.