matter

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matter

 [mat´er]
1. physical material having form and weight under ordinary conditions; called also substance.
2. pus.
gray matter areas of the nervous system where the nerve fibers are unmyelinated (not enveloped by a myelin sheath); it contains the bodies of the nerve cells. Tissue composed of myelinated fibers is called white matter. The cerebral cortex is entirely composed of gray matter and the cerebellum also contains some deep-seated masses of it. The spinal cord has a central core of gray matter surrounded by white matter; in cross section, its gray matter is shaped approximately like the letter H. Called also substantia grisea and gray substance.
white matter areas of the nervous system composed mostly of myelinated nerve fibers (those having myelin sheaths) constituting the conducting portion of the brain and spinal cord. Tissue composed of unmyelinated fibers is called gray matter. Called also substantia alba and white substance.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sub·stance

(sŭb'stănts),
Material.
Synonym(s): substantia [TA], matter
[L. substantia, essence, material, fr. sub- sto, to stand under, be present]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

matter

(măt′ər)
n.
1. A specific type of substance.
2. Discharge or waste, such as pus or feces, from a living organism.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

matter

Anatomy
Material substance that occupies cavities.

Physics
Material substance that occupies space.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

matter

Anatomy Stuff that occupies cavities. See Gray matter, White matter.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sub·stance

(sŭb'stăns)
Material.
Synonym(s): substantia [TA] , matter.
[L. substantia, essence, material, fr. sub-sto, to stand under, be present]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

matter

that which constitutes the substance of physical forms, has mass, occupies space and can be quantified.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"Making extremely hot, dense matter is important scientifically if we are ultimately to understand the conditions that exist inside stars and at the center of giant planets within our own solar system and beyond."
Despite the new findings and other, previous hints of quark-gluon plasma at RHIC, a stronger case will require observing several additional features of collision debris to rule out some other form of hot, dense matter.
"This is a great breakthrough, which could make the probing of very dense matter easier and more extensive, and so allow us to monitor nuclear fusion capsules imploding," the Scotsman quoted Professor Dino Jaroszyski, who led the physicists, as saying.
(4) Determine how uniformly warm dense matter can be heated with tailored short-pulse ion beams.
If many pulsars are older than their so-called characteristic age--the age deduced from their spin rate--theorists may have to revise models describing the stability and survival of such extremely dense matter.
The team hopes to study the properties of this hot, dense matter using new, more powerful lasers such as the Linac Coherent Light Source at Stanford, California.
Rosen is recognized internationally for major contributions to the development of laboratory soft X-ray lasers, and to the design and analysis of complex high energy density and ICF target physics experiments, elucidating electron and radiation transport, and the properties of hot dense matter. These experiments were carried out on a long line of high power lasers at LLNL and, along with the subsequent work of many others, formed the foundation for the national science-based stockpile stewardship effort and contributed to DOE approval of the National Ignition Facility.

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