metonymy

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metonymy

 [mĕ-ton´ĭ-me]
a disturbance of language seen in schizophrenia in which an inappropriate but related term is used instead of the correct one.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

me·ton·y·my

(mĕ-ton'i-mē)
Imprecise or circumscribed labeling of objects or events, characteristic of the language disturbance of people with schizophrenia; e.g., the patient speaks of having had a "menu" rather than a "meal."
[meta- + G. onyma, name]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

metonymy

(mĕ-tŏn′ĭ-mē) [Gr. meta, after, beyond, over, + onyma, name]
1. In rhetoric, a figure of speech in which one word is used for another, related one (e.g., “crown” for “king, ” “queen, ” “monarch, ” or “sovereign”).
2. In psychiatry, mental confusion exhibited in some schizophrenic disorders in which an imprecise but loosely related term is used for the correct one (e.g., “rifle” for “war, ” or “apple” for “ball”).
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
(83.) [Cicero], IV xxxii 43: Denominatio est quae ab rebus propinquis et finitimis trahit orationem qua possit intellegi res quae non suo vocabulo sit appellata.
sed tota illa denominatio quam objectum accipit a conceptibus nostris, est omnino extrinseca objecto, et intrinseca solum nostro intellectui, jam perfecte et adaequate, jam imperfecte et inadaequate concipienti"; Wietrowski, Logica, concl.