denitrification

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de·ni·tri·fi·ca·tion

(dē-nī'tri-fi-kā'shŭn),
1. Removal of nitrogen from any material or chemical compound; especially from the soil, as by certain (denitrifying) bacteria that render the nitrogen unavailable for plant growth.
2. Withdrawal of nitrogen from soil by plant growth.
Synonym(s): denitration

denitrification

the process by which nitrogenous compounds are degraded and nitrogen is returned to the air in gaseous form, e.g. the breaking down of nitrates and nitrites to gaseous nitrogen, carried out in the absence of oxygen by soil bacteria. The process is associated with waterlogged soils and low fertility. See NITROGEN CYCLE.
References in periodicals archive ?
[V.sup.5+] is the active center of the denitration catalyst and NO and [NH.sub.3] can easily adsorb on the [V.sup.5+] centers that promote the oxidation and reduction of NO.
Denitration of glycerol trinitrate by resting cells and cell extracts of Bacillus thuringiensis/cereus and Enterobacter agglomerans.
The stringent emission standards and the new policy on subsidies will encourage coal-fired power companies to adopt the denitration technology and also conduct an inspection on the existing denitration technology and relevant enterprises to phase out backward denitration technologies and enterprises below the denitration standards.
Electrochemical denitration of fluorotrinitromethane, Russ.
MHPS completed the delivery of an advanced flue gas denitration facility for Units 1 and 2 of the plant in 2016.
Indeed, denitration reaction via denitrase was observed with nitrated Histone H1.2 [125], glutamine synthetase [127], calmodulin [128], L-type [Ca.sup.2+] channel [129], cyclooxygenase [31], and so forth.
MKK has been providing flue gas scrubbing systems for desulfurization and denitration to the chemical industry in Japan since the mid-1950s.
As a result, in an atmosphere of low-temperature exhaust gases at 250 C after turbocharging, stable denitration effects were observed during a test on land, which led to shipboard tests on an operational vessel with an eye to practical use.