dendrite

(redirected from Dendrites)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Dendrites: cell body, Somatic nervous system

dendrite

 [den´drīt]
any of the threadlike extensions of the cytoplasm of a neuron; they typically branch into treelike processes, and compose most of the receptive surface of a neuron.
Dendrites in a multipolar neuron. From Dorland's, 2000.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

den·drite

(den'drīt),
1. One of the two types of branching protoplasmic processes of the nerve cell (the other being the axon). Synonym(s): dendritic process, dendron, neurodendrite, neurodendron
2. A crystalline treelike structure formed during the freezing of an alloy.
[G. dendritēs, relating to a tree]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dendrite

(dĕn′drīt′)
n.
1.
a. A mineral crystallizing in another mineral in the form of a branching or treelike mark.
b. A rock or mineral bearing such a mark or marks.
2. A branched protoplasmic extension of a nerve cell that conducts impulses from adjacent cells inward toward the cell body. A single nerve may possess many dendrites. Also called dendron.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

den·drite

(den'drīt)
1. One of the two types of branching protoplasmic processes of the nerve cell (the other being the axon).
Synonym(s): dendritic process, dendron, neurodendrite.
2. A crystalline treelike structure formed during the freezing of an alloy.
[G. dendritēs, relating to a tree]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

dendrite

(den'drit?) [Gr. dendrites, pert. to a tree]
Enlarge picture
DENDRITES
A short spike-shaped cell process. The term usually refers to the branched, tapering cell processes of neurons. Incoming synapses form on the neuronal dendrites, which often arborize, sometimes extensively. Synonym: dendron See: illustration

extracapsular dendrite

A dendrite of a neuron of autonomic ganglia that pierces the capsule surrounding the cell and extends for a considerable distance from the cell body.

intracapsular dendrite

A dendrite of a neuron of autonomic ganglia that branches beneath the capsule of the ganglion, forming a network about the cell body.
dendritic (den-drit'ik), adjective
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

dendrite

One of the usually numerous branches of a nerve cell that carry impulses toward the cell body. Dendrites allow the most complex interconnection between nerve cells, as in the brain, so that elaborate control arrangements over the passage of nerve impulses are made possible. Recent research suggests that sections of some dendrites can function independently.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

dendrite

or

dendron

a projection from the nerve cell which branches and conducts impulses towards the cell body from other neurones with which they have SYNAPSES. See NEURON, AXON and Fig. 228 .
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

den·drite

(den'drīt)
1. One of the two types of branching protoplasmic processes of the nerve cell.
Synonym(s): neurodendrite.
2. A crystalline treelike structure formed during the freezing of an alloy.
[G. dendritēs, relating to a tree]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The study, which sought to understand how signals make their way through dendrites, was conducted by researchers at Rice University, the University of Houston (UH) and the University of Texas Health Science Center (UTHealth) at Houston.
When a dendrite reaches the red phosphorus-coated separator, the battery's charging voltage changes, tipping off the battery management system that it should stop charging.
When the battery is in use, the film discharges stored ions and the underlying lithium anode refills it which helps in maintaining the film's ability to stop dendrite growth altogether.
Dendrites can be thought of as analogous to transistors in a computer, performing simple operations using electrical signals.
121 points within an area of 400 x 400 [micro]m on each section, which encompassed more than one primary dendrite arm, were measured the compositions automatically.
All kinase inhibitors significantly (p <0.01, Bonferroni's test) counteracted the effects of ropinirole on all three structural plasticity parameters (Figures 4(d)-4(f)), as supported by the significant two-way ANOVA interaction obtained on the maximal length of dendrites [[F.sub.(3,232)] = 11.0, p <0.0001], number of primary dendrites [[F.sub.(3,392)] = 6.6, p <0.0001], and soma area [[F.sub.(3,3i2)] = 5.1, p <0.001].
Once we know how and why dendrites form, we can actually work on avoiding their formation and thereby making devices safer.
Considering the usual CNTs that are currently available on the market, their length is in general about two orders of magnitude longer than dendrites and one order of magnitude longer than the sample region.
MAP-2 is the most abundant MAP in mammalian brains; it is mainly located in the dendrites in adult brains (Johnson & Jope, 1992; Conde & Caceres, 2009).