demoniac

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de·mo·ni·ac

(dĕ-mō'nē-ak), Negative or pejorative connotations of this word may render it offensive in come contexts.
Frenzied, fiendish, as if possessed by evil spirits.
[G. daimōn, a spirit]

demoniac

(dĕ-mŏ′nē-ak″)
1. Concerning or resembling a demon.
2. Frenzied, as if possessed by demons or evil spirits.
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References in periodicals archive ?
And it looked as follows: fasting preceded the day of the dispossession, then the ministers took turns in saying prayers and sermons over the demoniac, and the gathered audience supplemented these prayers with responses much alike a service or rite.
In "Reconciliation | Dispossession | Exorcism," she returns to her point in chapter 1 that dispossession could be extremely violent, to explore how dispossession taught demoniacs to resume normative behaviors.
(130) This blind test had legal precedent, being used by Sir Matthew Hale during the infamous trial of Rose Cullender and Amy Duny at Norwich Assizes in March 1662 to allay fears that the fits and convulsions of the youthful demoniac accusers were elaborate theatrics.
For example, "legion" in the story of the Gerasene demoniac is a metaphorical term, meaning a large number; the "one" equaling the "many" can be explained by the fractals of chaos-complexity theory.
Hollenbach, "Jesus, Demoniacs, and Public Authorities: A Socio-Historical Study," The Journal of the American Academy of Religion 49 (1981): 567-588; Deborah Amos, "The Littlest Victims," ABC News, April 13, 1999.
Lear voices the priests' sexual loathing of what lies beneath "the girdle," the accusations they make to justify their sexual violation of the female demoniacs. (50) "There's hell, there's darkness, there is the sulphurous pit, / Burning, scalding, stench, consumption; fie, fie, fie!
There are long silences in this movie, and these are accentuated by occasional background noises, such as the neighing of a horse, the cries of demoniacs, the screams of crucified men, or the laughter of children.
When Jesus came to the territory of the Gadarenes, two demoniacs who were coming from the tombs met him.
The others were located in Sepphoris (Galilee), Jericho, Gadara (where the Gadarene demoniacs of Matthew 8 lived), and Amathus on the island of Cyprus.
The possibility that physicians in individual cases of demonic possession were being influenced and manipulated by the families and communities of the demoniacs has been given little consideration by historians.
They see the procedure not as a throwback to medieval times when demoniacs were put to death, but as an advance.
While the continental undead are just as violent and dangerous, they do not need the devil to rise from the grave; rather, "they simply come back to life on their own and interact with the tangible world." (42) The unholy trinity of the devil, bodily possession, and earthly violence, abounding in English ghost stories and miracle stories of demoniacs, was not a popular continental theme.