Demodex

(redirected from Demodex mite)

Demodex

 [dem´o-deks]
a genus of mites parasitic within the hair follicles of the host, including the species D. folliculo´rum in man, and several other species in domestic and other animals.

Demodex

(dem'ō-deks),
A genus of minute (0.1-0.4 mm) follicular mites (family Demodicidae) that inhabit the skin and are usually found in the sebaceous glands and hair follicles of mammals, including humans. Some cases of blepharitis in humans have been attributed to Demodex infection; use of facial creams promotes Demodex infection in older women, resulting in facial erythema with follicular scaling.
[G. dēmos, tallow, + dēx, a woodworm]

Dem·o·dex

(dem'ō-deks)
A genus of minute mites that inhabit the skin and that are usually found in the sebaceous glands and hair follicles.
[G. dēmos, tallow, + dēx, a woodworm]
References in periodicals archive ?
It protects against heartworms, fleas, hookworms, roundworms, and whipworms, as well the Demodex mite.
The presence of Demodex mite and Malassezia yeast could be as a result of previous use of under dose of corticosteroids that resulted in flaring up of these organisms.
Demodectic mange is caused by the Demodex mite that lives within the hair follicles.
For confirmation, we epilated 4-6 lashes bearing the cylindrical dandruff and visualized the parasitic demodex mite under simple light microscopy.
This skin eruption looks like rosacea but is thought to be aggravated by the Demodex mite. "It's quite controversial whether the Demodex mite really causes this disease or not, but there appear to be some situations where Demodex mites may multiply and actually cause a facial eruption that look very much like rosacea," she said.
Known as the Demodex mite, the bug lives in the hair follicles of 96-98% of people and feeds on oils, hormones, and fluids around the follicle.
Miller, a subset of dogs will have a genetically inherited flaw in their immune systems that fails to keep the Demodex mite in check.
Overall, rosacea patients were nine times more likely to experience Demodex mite infestations than were healthy controls and the infestations were significantly denser in rosacea patients compared with controls.
Overall, rosacea patients were 9 times more likely to have Demodex mite infestations than healthy controls (odds ratio, 9.039).
The Demodex mite affects dogs to varying degrees, depending on where they live, said Kathryn Rook, VMD, of the department of dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, Philadelphia.