dehumanization

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de·hu·man·i·za·tion

(dē-hyū'măn-i-zā'shŭn),
Loss of human characteristics; brutalization by either mental or physical means; stripping one of self-esteem.
[de- + humanus, human, fr. homo, man]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
The stripping of human qualities from people or from situations involving people, as an expediency that allows the policy makers (in a totalitarian state) to justify untenable situations, as the persons of interest are ‘less than human’
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

de·hu·man·i·za·tion

(dē-hyū'măn-ī-zā'shŭn)
Loss of human characteristics; brutalization by either mental or physical means; stripping one of self-esteem.
[de- + humanus, human, fr. homo, man]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, dehumanising ideas and rhetoric do not have to be active and acute to be harmful.
Richard Kilpatrick, the Liberal Democrat's deputy opposition leader on the council, said: "Here we have yet another grossly ignorant statement from Manchester council as they continue to expose their dehumanising approach towards vulnerable people.
An example of the dehumanising effect that Thomas is researching involves the type of jobs that former mill workers did when they moved on to other work.
"It's almost like how, in war, you go through this bloody, dehumanising thing, and then something is defined out of it."
A little honesty in recognising the whole nature of the IVF procedure from the beginning would have prevented such a dehumanising situation, where the creation of multiple groups of human embryos in their hundreds of thousands, have led to their use as human guinea pigs, to be selected, rejected and most recently, to be used mixing animal and human life in the cause of science.
Hartmut Frank tells of German systematised window systems between the wars leading to the great success of Neufert's standardised details, which the author finds not at all dehumanising, this is followed by Giorgio Muratore's description of less happy attempts to systematise construction in post-war Italy.
The bomber targeted scientists and technicians, killing three and maiming 23, in his campaign against "dehumanising" new technology.
My husband has made a mess of my life; he has succeeded in dehumanising me and making life no more interesting to me.
Researchers at Duke University and Princeton University suggested that this function may disengage when people encounter others they consider disgusting, thus "dehumanising" their victims by failing to acknowledge they have thoughts and feelings.
The archbishop said the internet and mobile phones were "dehumanising" community life and that relationships had been weakened by the decline in face-to-face meetings.
French art house favourite Bruno Dumont (La Vie De Jesus, L'Humanite) contrasts the two scenes, underlining the dehumanising nature of daily life in war and peace.
That the cloning - which involves the destruction of human embryos, dehumanising the human being at the first stage of its embodiment - is obvious.