degree

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degree

 [dĕ-gre´]
1. a grade or rank within a series, especially a rank awarded to scholars by a college or university.
2. a unit of measure of temperature.
3. a unit of measure of arcs and angles, one degree being 1/360 of a circle.
4. one of the ranks or stages in a progressive series.
d's of freedom (df) the number of ways that the members of a sample can vary independently. For example, if a sample contains n scores and the sum of those scores is known, n − 1 scores are free to vary; the nth score, however, is not free to vary but is determined by the values of the other scores and the established sum of the scores. In this example, the degrees of freedom equal the sample size minus 1 (df = n − 1).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

de·gree

(dĕ-grē'),
1. One of the divisions on the scale of a measuring instrument such as a thermometer, barometer, etc. see Comparative Temperature Scales appendix.
2. The 360th part of the circumference of a circle.
3. A position or rank within a graded series.
4. A measure of damage to tissue.
[Fr. degré; L. gradus, a step]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

degree

(dĭ-grē′)
n.
1. A unit of measure on a temperature scale.
2. One of a series of steps in a process, course, or progression; a stage.
3. A classification of the severity of an injury, especially a burn.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

degree

Academentia A document that indicates completion of a course of study
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

de·gree

(dĕ-grē')
1. One of the divisions on the scale of a measuring instrument such as a thermometer or barometer. seescale.
2. The 360th part of the circumference of a circle.
3. A position or rank within a graded series.
4. A measure of damage to tissue.
[Fr. degré; L. gradus, a step]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

de·gree

(dĕ-grē')
1. One of the divisions on the scale of a measuring instrument such as a thermometer or barometer.
2. The 360th part of the circumference of a circle.
3. A position or rank within a graded series.
4. A measure of damage to tissue.
[Fr. degré; L. gradus, a step]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about degree

Q. What are first, second and third degree burns? What’s the difference between them and do they get treated in a different way?

A. Pain management for burns can be difficult since burns differ in type and severity. There are three types of burns:

First-degree burns are considered mild compared to other burns. They result in pain and reddening of the epidermis (outer layer of the skin).

Second-degree burns affect the epidermis and the dermis (lower layer of skin). They cause pain, redness, swelling, and blistering.

Third-degree burns go through the dermis and affect deeper tissues. They result in white or blackened, charred skin that may be numb.
Hope this helps.

http://www.webmd.com/pain-management/guide/pain-caused-by-burns

Q. Can someone know what sport requires the highest degree of fitness from its athletes? I wanted to be a great sportsman. I am from a family where fitness is given least importance. My father is diabetic and my mom from obesity. They have sick lifestyle and weird food pattern. They do not exercise at all and would laugh at me every time when I wear my shoes. I am normal but they just ignore me and think that I cannot be a sportsman. I would love to get moving and show this world that I can achieve my dreams. May father want me to help him and he is a truck driver. He eats 10 times per day and has never tried exercising his whole life. Already doctors have advice him and found that he has more cholesterol but he just phewphews them laughing. I think I have a great lesson from my parents on how not to be and I am very much interested in sports. Can someone know what sport requires the highest degree of fitness from its athletes?

A. it's good to hear you are taking responsibility over your health, it's not taken for granted. most sports, if you want to get in to Olympic standard,needs a great fitness. but i can tell you that swimming needs great physical strength, so is running and bicycle racing. so you can go do triathlon!

Q. What is the difference between MD an ND? I saw an ad for some pain reliving therapy with the degree ND attached to the therapist name. Is it the same as MD? Is this therapist a doctor? What does it mean?

A. You can read more about it in wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_of_Naturopathic_Medicine . You should notice that in many states this degree isn’t regulated, so essentially anyone can entitle himself as ND.

More discussions about degree
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References in classic literature ?
Penney--the head of the Egyptian medical service, who, in a small steamer, penetrated one degree beyond Gondokoro, and then came back to die of exhaustion at Karthoum--nor Miani, the Venetian, who, turning the cataracts below Gondokoro, reached the second parallel-- nor the Maltese trader, Andrea Debono, who pushed his journey up the Nile still farther--could work their way beyond the apparently impassable limit.
Ferguson carefully remarked that they had not gone beyond the second degree of south latitude, nor the twenty-ninth of east longitude.
For another hour I saw that pitiless column of mercury rise and rise until at four hundred and ten miles it stood at 153 degrees. Now it was that we began to hang upon those readings in almost breathless anxiety.
One hundred and fifty-three degrees had been the maximum temperature above the ice stratum.
"One estimates it thirty miles, because the internal heat, increasing at the rate of about one degree to each sixty to seventy feet depth, would be sufficient to fuse the most refractory substances at that distance beneath the surface.
It is Harvard which, first among New England colleges, confers an honorary degree upon a black man.
What is equally important, they are exhibiting a degree of common sense and self-control which is causing better relations to exist between the races, and is causing the Southern white man to learn to believe in the value of educating the men and women of my race.
Or to state the case in another manner:--the points in which all the species of a genus resemble each other, and in which they differ from the species of some other genus, are called generic characters; and these characters in common I attribute to inheritance from a common progenitor, for it can rarely have happened that natural selection will have modified several species, fitted to more or less widely-different habits, in exactly the same manner: and as these so-called generic characters have been inherited from a remote period, since that period when the species first branched off from their common progenitor, and subsequently have not varied or come to differ in any degree, or only in a slight degree, it is not probable that they should vary at the present day.
But the best evidence is afforded by parts or organs of an important and uniform nature occasionally varying so as to acquire, in some degree, the character of the same part or organ in an allied species.
Any part or organ developed to an extraordinary size or in an extraordinary manner, in comparison with the same part or organ in the allied species, must have gone through an extraordinary amount of modification since the genus arose; and thus we can understand why it should often still be variable in a much higher degree than other parts; for variation is a long-continued and slow process, and natural selection will in such cases not as yet have had time to overcome the tendency to further variability and to reversion to a less modified state.
The heat index in Virac town in Catanduanes soared to 52.2 degrees Celsius on Wednesday afternoon, the highest so far this year.