diffraction

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diffraction

 [dĭ-frak´shun]
the bending or breaking up of a ray of light into its component parts.

dif·frac·tion

(di-frak'shŭn),
Deflection of the rays of light from a straight line in passing by the edge of an opaque body or in passing an obstacle of about the size of the wavelength of the light.
[L. dif- fringo, pp. -fractus, to break in pieces]

dif·frac·tion

(di-frak'shŭn)
Deflection of the rays of light from a straight line in passing by the edge of an opaque body or in passing an obstacle of about the size of the wavelength of the light.
[L. dif- fringo, pp. -fractus, to break in pieces]

diffraction

Deviation of the direction of propagation of a beam of light, which occurs when the light passes the edge of an obstacle such as a diaphragm, the pupil of the eye or a spectacle frame. There are two consequences of this phenomenon. First, the image of a point source cannot be a point image but a diffraction pattern. This pattern depends upon the shape and size of the diaphragm as well as the wavelength of light. Second, a system of close, parallel and equidistant grooves, slits or lines ruled on a polished surface can produce a light spectrum by diffraction. This is called a diffraction grating. See Airy's disc; diffraction fringes; Maurice's theory.
References in periodicals archive ?
The L2 combined with the Ll frequency eliminates most of the error caused by signal defraction in the Earth's ionosphere.
Multiple holograms can share the same volume of the media and be read out selectively due to high Bragg, or defraction, selectivity of volumetric phase gratings.
"We wanted a way to test our machines, as well as our competitors, of what it is actually removing," said Bogia, marine sales engineer for Alfa Laval, "Light defraction lies to you.
The loss due to defraction is dependent on the type of surface.