scattering

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scattering

 [skat´er-ing]
a change in the direction of motion of a photon or subatomic particle as the result of a collision or interaction.

scattering

Etymology: ME, scateren
a change in the direction of photons caused by the interaction between photons and matter. In coherent scattering, an incident photon interacts with matter and excites an atom, causing it to vibrate. The vibration causes the photon to scatter. Also called Thompson scattering, unmodified scattering. In Compton scattering an incident photon interacts with an orbital electron, transferring some of its energy to that electron. The electron is ejected, and the photon is scattered.

scattering

a change in the direction of motion of a photon or subatomic particle as the result of a collision or interaction.
References in periodicals archive ?
ii) When the deflection angle of the ramp is considered as 25 deg.
The left deflection angle of the Ith bearing caused by elevation difference in the Ith span is given by
The variables treated with interval analysis are superelevation (e), deflection angle ([alpha]) and time for circular curve distance ([t.
15, the number of light received by absorbers decreased rapidly along with the increase of the incident light deflection angle.
Their published formula is different in two respects, however: (1) their approximation for the deflection angle of the bent plate assumes elastic, not plastic, plate deformation, and (2) a different correlation is used for the contraction coefficient, [C.
0] = 45[degrees] and 60[degrees] the gain reaches the maximum at an optimum deflection angle of [[Chi].
In order to find necessary deflection angle of the waveguide front surface, the material properties of the waveguide have to be known.
s] is deflection angle of the shank, Lf is length of the flute and z is the coordinate where the deflection is being calculated.
There will be a deflection angle, [theta] [member of] [0, [pi]), and an azimuthal angle, [psi] [member of] [0, 2[pi]> to be sampled statistically.
The maximum coupling deflection angle is in permisible limits (indicated by lines on Fig.
The small 5s lose velocity quickly though, so judging lead and sustained deflection angles would be tough at longer ranges: It is not designed for that.