science

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sci·ence

(sī'ents),
1. The branch of knowledge that produces theoretic explanations of natural phenomena based on experiments and observations.
2. An area of such knowledge that is restricted to explaining a limited class of phenomena.
[L. scientia, knowledge, fr. scio, to know]

science

(sī′əns)
n.
1.
a. The observation, identification, description, experimental investigation, and theoretical explanation of phenomena: new advances in science and technology.
b. Such activities restricted to a class of natural phenomena: the science of astronomy.
2. A systematic method or body of knowledge in a given area: the science of marketing.

science

Vox populi The formal and systematic study of natural phenomena. See Big science, Fraud in science, Little science, Junk science, Misconduct in science, Prediction science, Pseudoscience.

sci·ence

(sī'ĕns)
1. The branch of knowledge that produces theoretic explanations of natural phenomena based on experiments and observations.
2. An area of such knowledge that is restricted to explaining a limited class of phenomena.
[L. scientia, knowledge, fr. scio, to know]
References in periodicals archive ?
Claude largely credits the Universal Declaration of Human Rights for the fact that "sectarian definitions of science are widely eschewed, and racist and sexist attempts to slant the work of science are subject to unfettered criticism." But he faults scientific organizations for not sufficiently educating their members and the broader public: "To use their human rights, people need to know about them." It's a cause to which this book will most certainly contribute.
Within political science there are different concepts and definitions of science, and they, too, affect its relationships with NSF.
This will require that we challenge the conventional definitions of science and scientists.
Another segment from that same essay moves from revelations of reading habits toward textual explication through definitions of science fiction as part and parcel of a "metonymic process." Here he posits that the good reader will observe "the functional nature of the adult episteme," or at least heed the generative power of metaphor and image embedded in the webbing of a good science fiction text (77).
Changes are revealed when comparing survey results from the beginning to the end of the semester in personal preference for teaching styles, the desirability of working in a team, the approach to the subject taught and to lifelong learning, and personal definitions of science. Preliminary and exit laboratory survey results show the qualitative level of improvement in laboratory skills and abilities from the beginning to the end of the semester.