impulse control

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impulse control

Psychology The degree to which a person can control the desire for immediate gratification or other; IC may be the single most important indicator of a person's future adaptation in terms of number of friends, school performance and future employment. See BarOn test, Emotional intelligence, Marshmallow test.
References in periodicals archive ?
As in so many areas of life, deferred gratification delivers far sweeter pleasures than gorging greedily and immediately.
This was really just a study in deferred gratification, but quite by accident the researchers who did it happened to notice later that the kids who had managed to resist the marshmallow did much better in school, did much better in life.
In humans, deferred gratification has been linked to academic achievement.
Cops and crime ostensibly carry less risk than other recent AMC offerings ("The Walking Dead," "The Prisoner"), the disclaimer being that this format requires deferred gratification.
Still, there is no substitute for a sound, long-term investment strategy, particularly when combined with spending restraint at home and a bit of patience and deferred gratification. Most everything in the economy moves in cycles, and while some may have been trapped by bad circumstances, saving something is always preferable to saving nothing.
By summer's end, Calvin bought his laptop, but the greater asset may be the lessons of saving money and deferred gratification he learned from his parents.
A world where these officials and their cronies would be herded up into room and taught something called 'Deferred Gratification'.
It is because they have parents with high expectations of schools, who have often succeeded themselves through educational achievement and pass on that 'deferred gratification' to their offspring.
But she added: "A materialistic society which so readily promotes a culture of immediacy through new media and technology makes the concept of deferred gratification inherent in education anathema to many."
Where Americans generations ago deferred gratification in order to save, Americans today are expected to defer payment in order to spend.
[check] Deferred gratification, in that it may take months or years to see the beneficial results of their work.
In an exercise in deferred gratification, you enter through a solid timber door set in a blade of masonry some 7.5m high and flanked by equally tall etched glass panels 250mm wide.