antler

(redirected from Deer antlers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

antler

(ănt′lər)
n.
One of a pair of hornlike, bony, deciduous growths, often elongated and branched, on the head of an adult member of the deer family, usually found only on males.

ant′lered adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The expression level of Vps26A gene was up-regulatedin in the process of growth and development of deer antler.Vps26A gene has a higher expression level at 90 days than 30 days and 60 days.
Cell cycle genes PEDF and CDKN1C in growing deer antlers. Anat Rec (Hoboken) 2007;290:994-1004.
The problem is deer antlers might be quite good at breaking off tartar but they are so hard they crack the large molars at the back of the mouth.
Venison steaKs cost around pounds 4 to pounds 5, and on on the internet shopping website eBay, deer antlers fetching from pounds 10 a pair - although royal stag antlers can fetch as much as pounds 90.
Josh won the task, choosing to style his model's luscious locks into two large deer antlers. He said: "I got the hair and put metal pieces inside to build up the hair around it.
The largest set of deer antlers in New York State had "disappeared" from a display at the Erie County Fairgrounds in 1978, and as it turned out, Gumhalter may have been involved.
Recent studies indicate that calcium and phosphorus are by far the two most common minerals in deer antlers, yet there is a long list of other trace elements such as magnesium, sodium, potassium, barium, iron, aluminum, zinc, selenium, strontium and manganese that are needed by deer for optimum growth and health.
SOUTh KOREA: Police yesterday arrested a man who allegedly pocketed enormous profits by passing off cheap deer antlers imported from New Zealand as expensive homegrown items.
Vogel's practice of covering deer antlers in knitted wool, as she does in Dollarville 8 pointer, 2006, is even more emblematic of her concerns.