canon law

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canon law

A body of law and edicts that arise from and are adopted by an ecclesiastic authority, which guides how Christian organisations are governed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Si es patente, sin embargo, la decretal de Celestino III (1191-1198) Laudabilem, que aprueba la decision de un archidiacono de disolver un matrimonio consumado por defeccion de la fe de una de las partes.
Watt, "Jews and Christians in the Gregorian Decretals," Studies in Church History 29 (1992): 93-105.
It consisted in the Decretum Gratiani and the Decretales Gregorii IX or Decretals of Pope Gregory IX and was published in 1234.
Rabelais ridiculed the "Papimaniacs," who fetishize the pope and his utterances, the "Holy Decretals.
Bentley misunderstands Newman's controversial Tract 90 which involved less an attempt to reconcile the thirty-nine Articles with the patristic Church than with the modern Roman Catholic communion, even with the decretals of the Council of Trent.
He could even adopt the stridency of a psalmist and the imprecations of a prophet in his political letters: those ardent and cutting encyclicals of outrage he hurled as rebuttals to papal decretals, imitating and exaggerating their tone and their dependence upon biblical citations.
Unlike most conferences of religious figures, The Parliament of the World's Religions neither lectured the public nor concentrated on ecclesiastical window dressing of canons or constitutions or decretals.
Papacy, the only thing worth studying are the Decretals, which were
Non-English texts, however, also feature in the essays by Andrew Taylor and Mark Sherman: Taylor's piece studies a Latin manuscript, the Smithfield Decretals, and Sherman takes Dante's Commedia as the central text within his concluding piece on 'Problems of Bakhtin's Epic: Capitalism and the Image of History'.
Clerical continence in the fourth century: three papal decretals," Theological Studies, Vol.
The evidence which he adduces, largely from sermons and papal decretals, is impressive, and there can be no question of Augustine's significance as the Latin theologian who, to a very great degree, explained and, in some measure, inspired the change in Western religious thought in this field.
Until the nineteenth century all Roman pronouncements were classed as "bulls and constitutions, decretals and briefs".