sequence

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se·quence

(sē'kwens),
1. The succession, or following, of one thing, process, or event after another; in dysmorphology, a pattern of multiple anomalies derived from a single known or presumed prior anomaly or mechanical factor.
2. The imposition of a paricular order on a number of items.
Synonym(s): anomalad (2) , complex (8)
[L. sequor, to follow]

sequence

(sē′kwəns, -kwĕns′)
n.
1. A following of one thing after another; succession.
2. An order of succession; an arrangement.
3. Biochemistry The order of constituents in a polymer, especially the order of nucleotides in a nucleic acid or of the amino acids in a protein.
tr.v. se·quenced, se·quencing, se·quences
1. To organize or arrange in a sequence.
2. To determine the order of constituents in (a polymer, such as a nucleic acid or protein molecule).

sequence

Medspeak
The order of performing a task.

Molecular biology
noun A heteromeric chain of similar, but not identical molecules—e.g., nucleotides (in a gene) or amino acids (in a protein).

verb To determine the order of a sequence.

Paediatrics
(1) An array of multiple congenital anomalies resulting from an early single primary defect of morphogenesis which unleashes a cascade of secondary and tertiary defects.
(2) A group of clinicopathologic consequences of the aberrant formation of one or more early embryologic structures.

sequence

Pediatrics Anomalad An array of multiple congenital anomalies resulting from an early single 1º defect of morphogenesis that unleashes a 'cascade' of 2º and 3º defects; a sequence is also defined as a set of clinicopathologic consequences of the aberrant formation of one or more early embryologic structures. See Dysmorphology.
Sequence types  
Malformation Incorrect formation of tissues
Deformation Abnormal forces acting on normal tissues
Disruption Breakdown of normal tissue
Note: The Pierre-Robin sequence is caused by 1º mandibular hypoplasia, which results in a tongue that is too small for the oral cavity and which drops back–glossoptosis, blocking closure of the posterior palatal shelf, resulting in a high arched U-shaped cleft palate Examples of sequences include athyroidotic hypothyroidism sequence, DiGeorge sequence, early urethral obstruction sequence, bladder exstrophy sequence, cloacal extrophy sequence, holoprosencephaly sequence, jugular lymphatic obstruction sequence, Kartagener syndrome/sequence, Klippel-Feil sequence, laterality sequence, meningomyelocele, anencephaly, iniencephaly sequence, occult spinal dysraphism sequence, oligohydramnios sequence, Rokitansky sequence, septo-optic dysplasia–de Morsier sequence, sirenomelia sequence

se·quence

(sē'kwĕns)
The succession, or following, of one thing or event after another.
[L. sequor, to follow]

se·quence

(sē'kwĕns)
1. Succession, or following, of one thing, process, or event after another.
2. Imposition of a particular order on several items.
[L. sequor, to follow]
References in periodicals archive ?
and [{b.sub.i}] is monotonically decreasing sequence, and [member of] > [square root of 1-|a[|.sub.2]/|a|] for a [member of](-1,0),
Instead, if we take a decreasing sequence [v.sub.n] converging to a such that
Fix [eta][member of] (l, L) and let [u.sub.n] be a decreasing sequence converging to [beta] such that
Similarly, taking a decreasing sequence converging to [beta] with [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], we get [[eta].sup.2] + c[eta] + [??]([beta]) [less than or equal to] 0.
Similarly, [g.sub.2](n)/[h.sub.2](n) is also a strictly decreasing sequence by Eqs.
As seen in the proof of Lemma 3.2, [alpha](n) + [beta](n) is a strictly decreasing sequence. By Eq.
With above inequalities, we are ready to show that [t.sub.2,3](n)/[g.sub.2,3](n) is a strictly decreasing sequence. From Eqs.
Proposition 4.8 The only permutations not belonging to [c.sub.n](123, 132, 213, 321) are the alternating permutations in which the elements in odd positions form a decreasing sequence, and the elements in even positions form also a decreasing sequence.
If we represent the points (k, [[alpha].sub.k]) thus obtained, the result is a non decreasing sequence of [??]n/2[??] points situated strictly below the diagonal, except for [[alpha].sub.0] = 0.
4, where the position of points for decreasing sequences with two, three and four cuts is calculated by Monte Carlo simulation method.
This means that the permutation [sigma] consists of an increasing sequence of decreasing sequences. Such decreasing sequences are called layers of [sigma].